Numerical prediction of minor losses in high amplitude acoustic resonators

Said Boluriaan, Philip J. Morris

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

A time accurate high order numerical simulation performed on parallel computers is used to study the minor losses due to an abrupt change in a resonator cross-sectional area. A finite amplitude standing wave is established in the resonator using two different types of driver. In one case the entire resonator is shaken and in the other a line source is used to simulate the effect of a piston. It is found that a net pressure difference is generated across the change in cross-sectional area. It is argued that this is due to minor loss coefficients being different in one half cycle than the other in an oscillatory flow. This net pressure difference is almost constant along the resonator. The results of the numerical simulation are in very good agreement with the results of a complementary experiment for a wide variety of operating conditions. It is found that a quasi-steady approach underpredicts the minor losses. An empirical relationship is defined for the minor losses based on the results of the numerical simulation. An approach based on the second law of thermodynamics is also used to examine the loss of availability due to the minor losses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication8th AIAA/CEAS Aeroacoustics Conference and Exhibit
StatePublished - Dec 1 2002
Event8th AIAA/CEAS Aeroacoustics Conference and Exhibit, 2002 - Breckenridge, CO, United States
Duration: Jun 17 2002Jun 19 2002

Publication series

Name8th AIAA/CEAS Aeroacoustics Conference and Exhibit

Other

Other8th AIAA/CEAS Aeroacoustics Conference and Exhibit, 2002
CountryUnited States
CityBreckenridge, CO
Period6/17/026/19/02

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Aerospace Engineering
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

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