Nutrient fluxes from abandoned mine soils reclaimed with poultry manure and paper mill sludge

Ashlee L. Dere, Richard Charles Stehouwer, Kirsten E. McDonald

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

In the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States, intensive animal production generates manure nutrients in excess of crop needs, increasing the likelihood of transport to water bodies and degradation of ecosystems and water quality. In this same region, 150 years of extensive coal mining has severely degraded land and impaired streams. Excess manure could be utilized in mine reclamation, but the large application rates required for successful revegetation could result in significant nutrient discharge. A preliminary greenhouse study determined that composting or adding organic carbon to poultry layer manure greatly reduced nutrient leaching. Based on these results, a field reclamation study was established on a surface coal mine in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania in April 2006. Treatments include a lime and fertilizer control, two rates of composted poultry layer manure (78 and 156 Mg ha -1 dry weight), and two blends of fresh poultry manure (60 Mg ha -1 dry weight) mixed with paper mill sludge (90 and 170 Mg ha -1) to achieve C:N ratios of 20:1 and 30:1. Leachate was collected after every rain event using pan lysimeters located 30 cm below each treatment. Leachate analysis showed a pulse of NO 3 --N from the two rates of poultry manure and paper mill sludge blends (170 and 156 mg N L -1) occurred three months following application. Compost treatments showed no such pulse. Cumulative N losses were greatest in the manure/paper mill sludge blends, but the control retained the least amount of original added N. An initial pulse of phosphate (5.8 mg P L -1) from the control treatment was observed within the first month after application. Subsequently, all treatments show minimal leaching of P (less than 1.0 mg P L -1). This research supports that amending mine soils with either composted poultry layer manure or fresh manure mixed with paper mill sludge are effective strategies to facilitate establishment of sustained vegetative cover on mined lands. Composted poultry manure is superior at controlling N and P loss.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication25th Annual Meetings of the American Society of Mining and Reclamation and 10th Meeting of IALR 2008
Pages298-315
Number of pages18
Volume1
StatePublished - 2008
Event25th Annual Meetings of the American Society of Mining and Reclamation, ASMR 2008 and 10th Meeting of International Affiliation of Land Reclamationists, IALR 2008 - Richmond, VA, United States
Duration: Jun 14 2008Jun 19 2008

Other

Other25th Annual Meetings of the American Society of Mining and Reclamation, ASMR 2008 and 10th Meeting of International Affiliation of Land Reclamationists, IALR 2008
CountryUnited States
CityRichmond, VA
Period6/14/086/19/08

Fingerprint

Abandoned mines
Poultry
abandoned mine
Manures
poultry
Nutrients
manure
mill
sludge
Fluxes
Soils
nutrient
soil
Reclamation
Coal mines
Leaching
leachate
leaching
paper
Revegetation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology

Cite this

Dere, A. L., Stehouwer, R. C., & McDonald, K. E. (2008). Nutrient fluxes from abandoned mine soils reclaimed with poultry manure and paper mill sludge. In 25th Annual Meetings of the American Society of Mining and Reclamation and 10th Meeting of IALR 2008 (Vol. 1, pp. 298-315)
Dere, Ashlee L. ; Stehouwer, Richard Charles ; McDonald, Kirsten E. / Nutrient fluxes from abandoned mine soils reclaimed with poultry manure and paper mill sludge. 25th Annual Meetings of the American Society of Mining and Reclamation and 10th Meeting of IALR 2008. Vol. 1 2008. pp. 298-315
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Dere, AL, Stehouwer, RC & McDonald, KE 2008, Nutrient fluxes from abandoned mine soils reclaimed with poultry manure and paper mill sludge. in 25th Annual Meetings of the American Society of Mining and Reclamation and 10th Meeting of IALR 2008. vol. 1, pp. 298-315, 25th Annual Meetings of the American Society of Mining and Reclamation, ASMR 2008 and 10th Meeting of International Affiliation of Land Reclamationists, IALR 2008, Richmond, VA, United States, 6/14/08.

Nutrient fluxes from abandoned mine soils reclaimed with poultry manure and paper mill sludge. / Dere, Ashlee L.; Stehouwer, Richard Charles; McDonald, Kirsten E.

25th Annual Meetings of the American Society of Mining and Reclamation and 10th Meeting of IALR 2008. Vol. 1 2008. p. 298-315.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Dere AL, Stehouwer RC, McDonald KE. Nutrient fluxes from abandoned mine soils reclaimed with poultry manure and paper mill sludge. In 25th Annual Meetings of the American Society of Mining and Reclamation and 10th Meeting of IALR 2008. Vol. 1. 2008. p. 298-315