Nutrition and pediatric rheumatic disease. Hypothesis: Cytokines modulate nutritional abnormalities in rheumatic diseases

B. E. Ostrov

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Growth abnormalities are common in pediatric rheumatic diseases. Studies suggest that effects of inflammation such as anorexia, and adipose and muscle tissue breakdown contribute to the nutritional and growth aberrations. The effects of the various cytokines produced during inflammation create a vicious cycle of anorexia and increased catabolism, and may be responsible for the nutritional deficits seen. In future, specific treatment with anticytokine monoclonal antibodies may block these effects, minimizing the nutritional consequences of inflammation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)49-53
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Rheumatology
Volume19
Issue numberSUPPL. 33
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992

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Rheumatic Diseases
Anorexia
Pediatrics
Cytokines
Inflammation
Growth
Adipose Tissue
Monoclonal Antibodies
Muscles

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Rheumatology
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

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Nutrition and pediatric rheumatic disease. Hypothesis : Cytokines modulate nutritional abnormalities in rheumatic diseases. / Ostrov, B. E.

In: Journal of Rheumatology, Vol. 19, No. SUPPL. 33, 01.01.1992, p. 49-53.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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