Nuts and their bioactive constituents: Effects on serum lipids and other factors that affect disease risk

Penny Margaret Kris-Etherton, Shaomei Yu-Poth, Joan Sabaté, Hope E. Ratcliffe, Guixiang Zhao, Terry D. Etherton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

254 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Because nuts have favorable fatty acid and nutrient profiles, there is growing interest in evaluating their role in a heart-healthy diet. Nuts are low in saturated fatty acids and high in monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids. In addition, emerging evidence indicates that there are other bioactive molecules in nuts that elicit cardioprotective effects. These include plant protein, dietary fiber, micronutrients such as copper and magnesium, plant sterols, and phytochemicals. Few feeding studies have been conducted that have incorporated different nuts into the test diets to determine the effects on plasma lipids and lipoproteins. The total- and lipoprotein-cholesterol responses to these diets are summarized in this article. In addition, the actual cholesterol response was compared with the predicted response derived from the most current predictive equations for blood cholesterol. Results from this comparison showed that when subjects consumed test diets including nuts, there was an ≃25% greater cholesterol- lowering response than that predicted by the equations. These results suggest that there are non-fatty acid constituents in nuts that have additional cholesterol-lowering effects. Further studies are needed to identify these constituents and establish their relative cholesterol-lowering potency.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume70
Issue number3 SUPPL.
StatePublished - Sep 1 1999

Fingerprint

Nuts
Lipids
Cholesterol
Serum
Diet
Fatty Acids
Phytosterols
Monounsaturated Fatty Acids
Plant Proteins
Micronutrients
Dietary Fiber
Phytochemicals
Unsaturated Fatty Acids
Magnesium
Lipoproteins
Copper
Food
Acids

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

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title = "Nuts and their bioactive constituents: Effects on serum lipids and other factors that affect disease risk",
abstract = "Because nuts have favorable fatty acid and nutrient profiles, there is growing interest in evaluating their role in a heart-healthy diet. Nuts are low in saturated fatty acids and high in monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids. In addition, emerging evidence indicates that there are other bioactive molecules in nuts that elicit cardioprotective effects. These include plant protein, dietary fiber, micronutrients such as copper and magnesium, plant sterols, and phytochemicals. Few feeding studies have been conducted that have incorporated different nuts into the test diets to determine the effects on plasma lipids and lipoproteins. The total- and lipoprotein-cholesterol responses to these diets are summarized in this article. In addition, the actual cholesterol response was compared with the predicted response derived from the most current predictive equations for blood cholesterol. Results from this comparison showed that when subjects consumed test diets including nuts, there was an ≃25{\%} greater cholesterol- lowering response than that predicted by the equations. These results suggest that there are non-fatty acid constituents in nuts that have additional cholesterol-lowering effects. Further studies are needed to identify these constituents and establish their relative cholesterol-lowering potency.",
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Nuts and their bioactive constituents : Effects on serum lipids and other factors that affect disease risk. / Kris-Etherton, Penny Margaret; Yu-Poth, Shaomei; Sabaté, Joan; Ratcliffe, Hope E.; Zhao, Guixiang; Etherton, Terry D.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 70, No. 3 SUPPL., 01.09.1999.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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