Obesity and Self-Reported Short Sleep Duration: A Marker of Sleep Complaints and Chronic Psychosocial Stress

Alexandros Vgontzas, Slobodanka Pejovic, Susan Calhoun, Edward Bixler

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

The prevalence of obesity has reached such levels to be considered epidemic and a major public health problem. In addition to the well-established contributing factors of diet and exercise, more recently chronic sleep restriction has been identified as a novel factor that may explain the increasing prevalence of obesity. Self-reported sleep duration may serve to detect subjective sleep complaints, psychosocial stress, and unhealthy behaviors, whereas objective measures of sleep may play a promising role in predicting cardiometabolic morbidity among patients with sleep complaints.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)65-75
Number of pages11
JournalSleep Medicine Clinics
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2009

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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