Obesity, growth hormone and exercise

Gwendolyn Thomas, William J. Kraemer, Brett A. Comstock, Courtenay Dunn-Lewis, Carl M. Maresh, Jeff S. Volek

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Growth hormone (GH) is regulated, suppressed and stimulated by numerous physiological stimuli. However, it is believed that obesity disrupts the physiological and pathological factors that regulate, suppress or stimulate GH release. Pulsatile GH has been potently stimulated in healthy subjects by both aerobic and resistance exercise of the right intensity and duration. GH modulates fuel metabolism, reduces total fat mass and abdominal fat mass, and could be a potent stimulus of lipolysis when administered to obese individuals exogenously. Only pulsatile GH has been shown to augment adipose tissue lipolysis and, therefore, increasing pulsatile GH response may be a therapeutic target. This review discusses the factors that cause secretion of GH, how obesity may alter GH secretion and how both aerobic and resistance exercise stimulates GH, as well as how exercise of a specific intensity may be used as a stimulus for GH release in individuals who are obese. Only five prior studies have investigated exercise as a stimulus of endogenous GH in individuals who are obese. Based on prior literature, resistance exercise may provide a therapeutic target for releasing endogenous GH in individuals who are obese if specific exercise programme variables are utilized. Biological activity of GH indicates that this may be an important precursor to beneficial changes in body fat and lean tissue mass in obese individuals. However, additional research is needed including what molecular GH variants are acutely released and involved at target tissues as a result of different exercise stimuli and what specific exercise programme variables may serve to stimulate GH in individuals who are obese.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)839-849
Number of pages11
JournalSports Medicine
Volume43
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2013

Fingerprint

Growth Hormone
Obesity
Exercise
Lipolysis
Adipose Tissue
Abdominal Fat
Healthy Volunteers
Fats

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Thomas, G., Kraemer, W. J., Comstock, B. A., Dunn-Lewis, C., Maresh, C. M., & Volek, J. S. (2013). Obesity, growth hormone and exercise. Sports Medicine, 43(9), 839-849. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40279-013-0064-7
Thomas, Gwendolyn ; Kraemer, William J. ; Comstock, Brett A. ; Dunn-Lewis, Courtenay ; Maresh, Carl M. ; Volek, Jeff S. / Obesity, growth hormone and exercise. In: Sports Medicine. 2013 ; Vol. 43, No. 9. pp. 839-849.
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Thomas, G, Kraemer, WJ, Comstock, BA, Dunn-Lewis, C, Maresh, CM & Volek, JS 2013, 'Obesity, growth hormone and exercise', Sports Medicine, vol. 43, no. 9, pp. 839-849. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40279-013-0064-7

Obesity, growth hormone and exercise. / Thomas, Gwendolyn; Kraemer, William J.; Comstock, Brett A.; Dunn-Lewis, Courtenay; Maresh, Carl M.; Volek, Jeff S.

In: Sports Medicine, Vol. 43, No. 9, 01.09.2013, p. 839-849.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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Thomas G, Kraemer WJ, Comstock BA, Dunn-Lewis C, Maresh CM, Volek JS. Obesity, growth hormone and exercise. Sports Medicine. 2013 Sep 1;43(9):839-849. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40279-013-0064-7