Obesity, school obesity prevalence, and adolescent childbearing among U.S. young women

Jennifer B. Kane, Michelle Lynn Frisco

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the United States, adolescent obesity reduces young women's odds of forming romantic and sexual partnerships but increases the likelihood of risky sexual behavior when partnerships occur. This led us to conduct a study examining the relationship between adolescent obesity and adolescent childbearing. Our study has two aims. We draw from prior research to develop and test competing hypotheses about the association between adolescent obesity and young women's risk of an adolescent birth. Drawing from risk regulation theory, we also examine whether the association between obesity and young women's risk of an adolescent birth may vary across high schools with different proportions of obese adolescents. Multilevel logistic regression models are used to analyze data from 4242 female students in 102 U.S. high schools who participated in Wave I (1994-1995) of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Results are the first to show that obesity reduces female adolescents' odds of childbearing, but that this association is not uniform across schools with different proportions of obese students. As the obesity prevalence in a school increases, so do obese young women's odds of childbearing. We conclude that understanding whether and how obesity is associated with young women's odds of having an adolescent birth requires attention to the weight context of high schools.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)108-115
Number of pages8
JournalSocial Science and Medicine
Volume88
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2013

Fingerprint

Pediatric Obesity
Obesity
adolescent
school
Parturition
Logistic Models
National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health
Students
Clothing
Sexual Behavior
regulation theory
female adolescent
female student
Weights and Measures
longitudinal study
logistics
Research
regression

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • History and Philosophy of Science

Cite this

@article{23c95fdb543c4243b1ad8fde3244825f,
title = "Obesity, school obesity prevalence, and adolescent childbearing among U.S. young women",
abstract = "In the United States, adolescent obesity reduces young women's odds of forming romantic and sexual partnerships but increases the likelihood of risky sexual behavior when partnerships occur. This led us to conduct a study examining the relationship between adolescent obesity and adolescent childbearing. Our study has two aims. We draw from prior research to develop and test competing hypotheses about the association between adolescent obesity and young women's risk of an adolescent birth. Drawing from risk regulation theory, we also examine whether the association between obesity and young women's risk of an adolescent birth may vary across high schools with different proportions of obese adolescents. Multilevel logistic regression models are used to analyze data from 4242 female students in 102 U.S. high schools who participated in Wave I (1994-1995) of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Results are the first to show that obesity reduces female adolescents' odds of childbearing, but that this association is not uniform across schools with different proportions of obese students. As the obesity prevalence in a school increases, so do obese young women's odds of childbearing. We conclude that understanding whether and how obesity is associated with young women's odds of having an adolescent birth requires attention to the weight context of high schools.",
author = "Kane, {Jennifer B.} and Frisco, {Michelle Lynn}",
year = "2013",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.socscimed.2013.04.005",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "88",
pages = "108--115",
journal = "Social Science and Medicine",
issn = "0277-9536",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",

}

Obesity, school obesity prevalence, and adolescent childbearing among U.S. young women. / Kane, Jennifer B.; Frisco, Michelle Lynn.

In: Social Science and Medicine, Vol. 88, 01.07.2013, p. 108-115.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Obesity, school obesity prevalence, and adolescent childbearing among U.S. young women

AU - Kane, Jennifer B.

AU - Frisco, Michelle Lynn

PY - 2013/7/1

Y1 - 2013/7/1

N2 - In the United States, adolescent obesity reduces young women's odds of forming romantic and sexual partnerships but increases the likelihood of risky sexual behavior when partnerships occur. This led us to conduct a study examining the relationship between adolescent obesity and adolescent childbearing. Our study has two aims. We draw from prior research to develop and test competing hypotheses about the association between adolescent obesity and young women's risk of an adolescent birth. Drawing from risk regulation theory, we also examine whether the association between obesity and young women's risk of an adolescent birth may vary across high schools with different proportions of obese adolescents. Multilevel logistic regression models are used to analyze data from 4242 female students in 102 U.S. high schools who participated in Wave I (1994-1995) of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Results are the first to show that obesity reduces female adolescents' odds of childbearing, but that this association is not uniform across schools with different proportions of obese students. As the obesity prevalence in a school increases, so do obese young women's odds of childbearing. We conclude that understanding whether and how obesity is associated with young women's odds of having an adolescent birth requires attention to the weight context of high schools.

AB - In the United States, adolescent obesity reduces young women's odds of forming romantic and sexual partnerships but increases the likelihood of risky sexual behavior when partnerships occur. This led us to conduct a study examining the relationship between adolescent obesity and adolescent childbearing. Our study has two aims. We draw from prior research to develop and test competing hypotheses about the association between adolescent obesity and young women's risk of an adolescent birth. Drawing from risk regulation theory, we also examine whether the association between obesity and young women's risk of an adolescent birth may vary across high schools with different proportions of obese adolescents. Multilevel logistic regression models are used to analyze data from 4242 female students in 102 U.S. high schools who participated in Wave I (1994-1995) of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Results are the first to show that obesity reduces female adolescents' odds of childbearing, but that this association is not uniform across schools with different proportions of obese students. As the obesity prevalence in a school increases, so do obese young women's odds of childbearing. We conclude that understanding whether and how obesity is associated with young women's odds of having an adolescent birth requires attention to the weight context of high schools.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84878138064&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84878138064&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.socscimed.2013.04.005

DO - 10.1016/j.socscimed.2013.04.005

M3 - Article

C2 - 23702216

AN - SCOPUS:84878138064

VL - 88

SP - 108

EP - 115

JO - Social Science and Medicine

JF - Social Science and Medicine

SN - 0277-9536

ER -