Observations of the relationship between ionospheric central polar cap and dayside throat convection velocities, and solar wind/IMF driving

W. A. Bristow, E. Amata, J. Spaleta, M. F. Marcucci

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Convection observations from the Southern Hemisphere Super Dual Auroral Radar Network are presented and examined for their relationship to solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions, restricted to periods of steady IMF. Analysis is concentrated on two specific regions, the central polar cap and the dayside throat region. An example time series is discussed in detail with specific examples of apparent direct control of the convection velocity by the solar wind driver. Closer examination, however, shows that there is variability in the flows that cannot be explained by the driving. Scatterplots and histograms of observations from all periods in the year 2013 that met the selection criteria are given and their dependence on solar wind driving is examined. It is found that on average the flow velocity depends on the square root of the rate of flux entry to the polar cap. It is also found that there is a large level of variability that is not strongly related to the solar wind driving. Key Points Polar cap and dayside velocities show dependence on IMF/solar wind Velocity of variability is higher than that of IMF/solar wind Variability appears to be independent of driving

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4684-4699
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics
Volume120
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2015

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geophysics
  • Forestry
  • Oceanography
  • Aquatic Science
  • Ecology
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Soil Science
  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Earth-Surface Processes
  • Atmospheric Science
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Palaeontology

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