Occlusion of pressor responses to posterior diencephalic stimulation and muscular contraction

Kenneth J. Rybicki, Richard W. Stremel, Gary A. Iwamoto, Jere H. Mitchell, Marc Kaufman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Although neural occlusion has been suggested to occur between the central and reflex mechanisms increasing arterial pressure, evidence consistent with this phenomenon is lacking. To assess the possibility of neural occlusion we recorded, in chloralose-anesthetized cats, the pressor responses to statically contracting the hindlimb muscles and to electrically stimulating histologically confirmed sites in the posterior hypothalamus and subthalamus. We also recorded the pressor responses to topical application of capsaicin onto the intestine and to stimulation of these diencephalic sites. The pressor responses to simultaneous static contraction and diencephalic stimulation were significantly smaller than the algebraic sum of the pressor responses to contraction and diencephalic stimulation evoked separately. Likewise, the pressor responses to simultaneous capsaicin application and diencephalic stimulation were significantly smaller than the algebraic sum of the responses evoked separately. High intensity stimulation of the L7 dorsal root or the diencephalic sites evoked pressor responses similar in magnitude to the algebraic sum of the two responses evoked separately; thus, the inability of the simultaneous maneuvers to evoke pressor responses that summed algebraically was not due to the fact that they caused a maximal effect. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that neural occlusion occurs during stimulation of the posterior diencephalon and static muscular contraction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)305-312
Number of pages8
JournalBrain Research Bulletin
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1989

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)

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