Occupational Exposures and Salivary Gland Cancer Mortality among African American and White Workers in the United States

Robin T. Wilson, Lee E. Moore, Mustafa Dosemeci

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We conducted a large death certificate-based case-control study to assess occupational risks for salivary gland cancer. African American (168 cases, 672 controls) and white (2237 cases, 8748 controls) cases from 24 states (1984-1989) were matched to controls by age, sex, race, and region. Race- and sex-stratified multiple logistic regression models calculated adjusted odds ratios. The proportion of young cases (<50 years) was greatest among African Americans (20.8% vs. 8.8%). Higher socioeconomic status, ionizing radiation, formaldehyde, solvents, outdoor work, and animal contact were associated with elevated risk among white men. Physical activity reduced mortality risks among men, although significantly only among whites. Odds ratios for formaldehyde, solvents, benzene, and animal contact were 2.0 or greater among African American women, although not statistically significant. These findings suggest occupational and demographic factors needing further investigation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)287-297
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of occupational and environmental medicine
Volume46
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2004

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Salivary Gland Neoplasms
Occupational Exposure
African Americans
Formaldehyde
Mortality
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Death Certificates
Ionizing Radiation
Benzene
Social Class
Case-Control Studies
Demography
Exercise

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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Occupational Exposures and Salivary Gland Cancer Mortality among African American and White Workers in the United States. / Wilson, Robin T.; Moore, Lee E.; Dosemeci, Mustafa.

In: Journal of occupational and environmental medicine, Vol. 46, No. 3, 01.03.2004, p. 287-297.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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