Older Siblings as Academic Socialization Agents for Younger Siblings: Developmental Pathways across Adolescence

Ming Te Wang, Jessica Lauren Degol, Jamie L. Amemiya

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The role of older siblings in younger siblings’ academic socialization becomes increasingly salient during adolescence. This longitudinal study examines the developmental mechanisms through which older siblings shape younger siblings’ academic outcomes and whether older siblings’ peer affiliations predict younger siblings’ educational aspirations and attainment. Data consisted of responses from 395 target adolescents (M age = 12.22 years, 48.9% female; 51.6% African American, 38.5% European American) and their older siblings (M age = 14.65 years, 50.1% female) across nine years. The findings showed that older siblings’ affiliation with academically disengaged peers at 7th grade predicted younger siblings’ decreased affiliation with academically engaged peers and increased affiliation with disengaged peers at 9th grade. In addition, younger siblings’ affiliation with academically engaged peers predicted greater educational aspirations at 11th grade, which in turn were related to higher postsecondary educational attainment. The identification of developmental processes through which older siblings were associated with younger siblings’ academic success may aid in creating supportive social environments in which adolescents can thrive.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of youth and adolescence
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Socialization
socialization
adolescence
Siblings
school grade
adolescent
Social Environment
academic success
African Americans
Longitudinal Studies
longitudinal study

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

@article{51ebef89373f45bcb47103c056161a73,
title = "Older Siblings as Academic Socialization Agents for Younger Siblings: Developmental Pathways across Adolescence",
abstract = "The role of older siblings in younger siblings’ academic socialization becomes increasingly salient during adolescence. This longitudinal study examines the developmental mechanisms through which older siblings shape younger siblings’ academic outcomes and whether older siblings’ peer affiliations predict younger siblings’ educational aspirations and attainment. Data consisted of responses from 395 target adolescents (M age = 12.22 years, 48.9{\%} female; 51.6{\%} African American, 38.5{\%} European American) and their older siblings (M age = 14.65 years, 50.1{\%} female) across nine years. The findings showed that older siblings’ affiliation with academically disengaged peers at 7th grade predicted younger siblings’ decreased affiliation with academically engaged peers and increased affiliation with disengaged peers at 9th grade. In addition, younger siblings’ affiliation with academically engaged peers predicted greater educational aspirations at 11th grade, which in turn were related to higher postsecondary educational attainment. The identification of developmental processes through which older siblings were associated with younger siblings’ academic success may aid in creating supportive social environments in which adolescents can thrive.",
author = "Wang, {Ming Te} and Degol, {Jessica Lauren} and Amemiya, {Jamie L.}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s10964-019-01005-2",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Journal of Youth and Adolescence",
issn = "0047-2891",
publisher = "Springer New York",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Older Siblings as Academic Socialization Agents for Younger Siblings

T2 - Developmental Pathways across Adolescence

AU - Wang, Ming Te

AU - Degol, Jessica Lauren

AU - Amemiya, Jamie L.

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - The role of older siblings in younger siblings’ academic socialization becomes increasingly salient during adolescence. This longitudinal study examines the developmental mechanisms through which older siblings shape younger siblings’ academic outcomes and whether older siblings’ peer affiliations predict younger siblings’ educational aspirations and attainment. Data consisted of responses from 395 target adolescents (M age = 12.22 years, 48.9% female; 51.6% African American, 38.5% European American) and their older siblings (M age = 14.65 years, 50.1% female) across nine years. The findings showed that older siblings’ affiliation with academically disengaged peers at 7th grade predicted younger siblings’ decreased affiliation with academically engaged peers and increased affiliation with disengaged peers at 9th grade. In addition, younger siblings’ affiliation with academically engaged peers predicted greater educational aspirations at 11th grade, which in turn were related to higher postsecondary educational attainment. The identification of developmental processes through which older siblings were associated with younger siblings’ academic success may aid in creating supportive social environments in which adolescents can thrive.

AB - The role of older siblings in younger siblings’ academic socialization becomes increasingly salient during adolescence. This longitudinal study examines the developmental mechanisms through which older siblings shape younger siblings’ academic outcomes and whether older siblings’ peer affiliations predict younger siblings’ educational aspirations and attainment. Data consisted of responses from 395 target adolescents (M age = 12.22 years, 48.9% female; 51.6% African American, 38.5% European American) and their older siblings (M age = 14.65 years, 50.1% female) across nine years. The findings showed that older siblings’ affiliation with academically disengaged peers at 7th grade predicted younger siblings’ decreased affiliation with academically engaged peers and increased affiliation with disengaged peers at 9th grade. In addition, younger siblings’ affiliation with academically engaged peers predicted greater educational aspirations at 11th grade, which in turn were related to higher postsecondary educational attainment. The identification of developmental processes through which older siblings were associated with younger siblings’ academic success may aid in creating supportive social environments in which adolescents can thrive.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85064266980&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85064266980&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10964-019-01005-2

DO - 10.1007/s10964-019-01005-2

M3 - Article

C2 - 30903366

AN - SCOPUS:85064266980

JO - Journal of Youth and Adolescence

JF - Journal of Youth and Adolescence

SN - 0047-2891

ER -