On how deaf people might use speech to control devices

Jeffrey P. Bigham, Raja Kushalnagar, Kenneth Huang, Juan Pablo Flores, Saiph Savage

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Smart devices connected to the Internet are proliferating. To reduce costs of devices that have traditionally been inexpensive (toasters, microwaves, printers, etc), many of these devices have chosen to use a speech interface rather than a visual one. This transition has been hastened by the increasing capabilities of speech interfaces, exemplified by products like Amazon Echo and Apple's Siri. A consequence of these products moving to voice control is that people who are deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) may be unable to use them. In this paper, we briefly introduce two technical approaches we are pursuing for enabling DHH people to provide input to these devices: (i) human computation workflows for understanding "deaf speech," and (ii) mobile interfaces that can be instructed to speak on the user's behalf.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationASSETS 2017 - Proceedings of the 19th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery, Inc
Pages383-384
Number of pages2
ISBN (Electronic)9781450349260
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 19 2017
Event19th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility, ASSETS 2017 - Baltimore, United States
Duration: Oct 29 2017Nov 1 2017

Publication series

NameASSETS 2017 - Proceedings of the 19th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility

Other

Other19th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility, ASSETS 2017
CountryUnited States
CityBaltimore
Period10/29/1711/1/17

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Software
  • Hardware and Architecture
  • Computer Networks and Communications

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'On how deaf people might use speech to control devices'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Bigham, J. P., Kushalnagar, R., Huang, K., Flores, J. P., & Savage, S. (2017). On how deaf people might use speech to control devices. In ASSETS 2017 - Proceedings of the 19th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility (pp. 383-384). (ASSETS 2017 - Proceedings of the 19th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility). Association for Computing Machinery, Inc. https://doi.org/10.1145/3132525.3134821