On innovation: How do revenue variations affect research expenditures within U.S. research universities?

Larry Leslie, Sheila Slaughter, Barrett Taylor, Liang Zhang

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

In this study we examine the revenue expenditure relationships within public and private research and doctoral institutions. Results suggest tight relationships between some revenue and expenditure categories. Instructional expenditures are significantly influenced by revenues from tuition and fees, governmental appropriations (for public institutions), and grants and contracts. These results are significant both statistically and substantively. Research expenditures are affected first and foremost by government grants and contracts, and this is especially true at private institutions. Revenues from tuition, appropriation, and private gifts have a rather moderate effect on research expenditure. These results are consistent with the resource dependency interpretation of resource allocation patterns. Although the relationships between some revenue and expenditure categories are tight, the categories themselves are very broad and defined by historical convention rather than current practices and may need refinement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2009 Atlanta Conference on Science and Innovation Policy, ACSIP 2009
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2009
Event2009 Atlanta Conference on Science and Innovation Policy, ACSIP 2009 - Atlanta, GA, United States
Duration: Oct 2 2009Oct 3 2009

Publication series

Name2009 Atlanta Conference on Science and Innovation Policy, ACSIP 2009

Other

Other2009 Atlanta Conference on Science and Innovation Policy, ACSIP 2009
CountryUnited States
CityAtlanta, GA
Period10/2/0910/3/09

Fingerprint

revenue
expenditures
Innovation
innovation
university
grant
private institution
public institution
Resource allocation
gift
resources
fee
interpretation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Computer Science(all)
  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Leslie, L., Slaughter, S., Taylor, B., & Zhang, L. (2009). On innovation: How do revenue variations affect research expenditures within U.S. research universities? In 2009 Atlanta Conference on Science and Innovation Policy, ACSIP 2009 [5367822] (2009 Atlanta Conference on Science and Innovation Policy, ACSIP 2009). https://doi.org/10.1109/ACSIP.2009.5367822
Leslie, Larry ; Slaughter, Sheila ; Taylor, Barrett ; Zhang, Liang. / On innovation : How do revenue variations affect research expenditures within U.S. research universities?. 2009 Atlanta Conference on Science and Innovation Policy, ACSIP 2009. 2009. (2009 Atlanta Conference on Science and Innovation Policy, ACSIP 2009).
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Leslie, L, Slaughter, S, Taylor, B & Zhang, L 2009, On innovation: How do revenue variations affect research expenditures within U.S. research universities? in 2009 Atlanta Conference on Science and Innovation Policy, ACSIP 2009., 5367822, 2009 Atlanta Conference on Science and Innovation Policy, ACSIP 2009, 2009 Atlanta Conference on Science and Innovation Policy, ACSIP 2009, Atlanta, GA, United States, 10/2/09. https://doi.org/10.1109/ACSIP.2009.5367822

On innovation : How do revenue variations affect research expenditures within U.S. research universities? / Leslie, Larry; Slaughter, Sheila; Taylor, Barrett; Zhang, Liang.

2009 Atlanta Conference on Science and Innovation Policy, ACSIP 2009. 2009. 5367822 (2009 Atlanta Conference on Science and Innovation Policy, ACSIP 2009).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Leslie L, Slaughter S, Taylor B, Zhang L. On innovation: How do revenue variations affect research expenditures within U.S. research universities? In 2009 Atlanta Conference on Science and Innovation Policy, ACSIP 2009. 2009. 5367822. (2009 Atlanta Conference on Science and Innovation Policy, ACSIP 2009). https://doi.org/10.1109/ACSIP.2009.5367822