On research relevance, professors’ “real world” experience, and management development

Are we closing the gap?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This small-sample (N = 84) study investigated human resource management practitioners’ views of academic research relevance to, and management professor effectiveness in, management development. Results indicate that practitioners do not particularly value academic research, especially relative to other kinds of information they may access in pursuing their management development. Practitioners view management professors as somewhat ineffective, especially relative to executives and consultants, as instructors in management development seminars and workshops. A curvilinear relationship between company size and respondents’ ratings of both academic information's utility and professors’ effectiveness was also observed. Implications for future research are discussed, as well as for efforts to enhance research's relevance and increase professors’ managerial work exposure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)598-613
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Management Development
Volume18
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 1999

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Management development
Academic research
Management effectiveness
Consultants
Small sample
Rating
Human resource management
Managerial work
Company size

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Business, Management and Accounting (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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