On the measurement and identification of turning points in criminology

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Since their introduction to criminology, turning points have been of substantial theoretical and empirical focus for scholars of desistance. In this review, we consider how criminologists have sought to identify change in the criminal career by reflecting on the identification and measurement of turning points. We contend that important life events, such as marriage and employment, are endogenous to the desistance process and as such present challenges for scholars regarding the causal identification of turning points. Specifically, we argue that both selection bias and simultaneity bias are fundamental principles of the life-course framework. We present a formal way to think about the causal identification of turning points in the face of endogeneity and also consider several conceptual issues relating to the definition and measurement of turning points. In the end, we encourage scholars to adopt creative methodological strategies to unpack turning points.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)359-377
Number of pages19
JournalAnnual Review of Criminology
Volume1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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criminology
trend
marriage
career
event
present

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Law

Cite this

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abstract = "Since their introduction to criminology, turning points have been of substantial theoretical and empirical focus for scholars of desistance. In this review, we consider how criminologists have sought to identify change in the criminal career by reflecting on the identification and measurement of turning points. We contend that important life events, such as marriage and employment, are endogenous to the desistance process and as such present challenges for scholars regarding the causal identification of turning points. Specifically, we argue that both selection bias and simultaneity bias are fundamental principles of the life-course framework. We present a formal way to think about the causal identification of turning points in the face of endogeneity and also consider several conceptual issues relating to the definition and measurement of turning points. In the end, we encourage scholars to adopt creative methodological strategies to unpack turning points.",
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On the measurement and identification of turning points in criminology. / Nguyen, Holly; Loughran, Thomas.

In: Annual Review of Criminology, Vol. 1, 01.01.2018, p. 359-377.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - On the measurement and identification of turning points in criminology

AU - Nguyen, Holly

AU - Loughran, Thomas

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AB - Since their introduction to criminology, turning points have been of substantial theoretical and empirical focus for scholars of desistance. In this review, we consider how criminologists have sought to identify change in the criminal career by reflecting on the identification and measurement of turning points. We contend that important life events, such as marriage and employment, are endogenous to the desistance process and as such present challenges for scholars regarding the causal identification of turning points. Specifically, we argue that both selection bias and simultaneity bias are fundamental principles of the life-course framework. We present a formal way to think about the causal identification of turning points in the face of endogeneity and also consider several conceptual issues relating to the definition and measurement of turning points. In the end, we encourage scholars to adopt creative methodological strategies to unpack turning points.

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