On the relation between social-emotional and school functioning during early adolescence preliminary findings from Dutch and American samples

Robert W. Roeser, Kees Van der Wolf, Karen R. Strobel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study, we used data collected from early adolescents (ages 12 to 14 years) in the San Francisco Bay area of the United States and Amsterdam, The Netherlands to examine two questions concerning their social-emotional and school functioning. First, we compared adolescents' self-reported emotional-behavioral problems, general self-esteem, and their sense that negative moods interfered with their ability to learn in school across the two samples. Consistent with previous research, we found that American youth reported more internalizing and externalizing problems than did their Dutch peers, and said that negative moods interfered more with their ability to learn in school. Second, we examined the relative predictive relations between adolescents’ social-emotional functioning and motivation to learn and their reported investment in or disaffection from school. Both sets of indices predicted investment in both samples, although the pattern of significant relations differed by country. Findings are discussed in relation to a broader model of the social, demographic, and psychological processes that shape patterns of academic investment or disaffection, achievement, and choice during the adolescent years.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)111-139
Number of pages29
JournalJournal of School Psychology
Volume39
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

Fingerprint

Social Relations
adolescence
adolescent
Aptitude
mood
school
ability
San Francisco
self-esteem
Netherlands
Self Concept
Motivation
Demography
Psychology
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

@article{1af2030cb5ea47f898fe0371d062d7d0,
title = "On the relation between social-emotional and school functioning during early adolescence preliminary findings from Dutch and American samples",
abstract = "In this study, we used data collected from early adolescents (ages 12 to 14 years) in the San Francisco Bay area of the United States and Amsterdam, The Netherlands to examine two questions concerning their social-emotional and school functioning. First, we compared adolescents' self-reported emotional-behavioral problems, general self-esteem, and their sense that negative moods interfered with their ability to learn in school across the two samples. Consistent with previous research, we found that American youth reported more internalizing and externalizing problems than did their Dutch peers, and said that negative moods interfered more with their ability to learn in school. Second, we examined the relative predictive relations between adolescents’ social-emotional functioning and motivation to learn and their reported investment in or disaffection from school. Both sets of indices predicted investment in both samples, although the pattern of significant relations differed by country. Findings are discussed in relation to a broader model of the social, demographic, and psychological processes that shape patterns of academic investment or disaffection, achievement, and choice during the adolescent years.",
author = "Roeser, {Robert W.} and {Van der Wolf}, Kees and Strobel, {Karen R.}",
year = "2001",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/S0022-4405(01)00060-7",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "39",
pages = "111--139",
journal = "Journal of School Psychology",
issn = "0022-4405",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",
number = "2",

}

On the relation between social-emotional and school functioning during early adolescence preliminary findings from Dutch and American samples. / Roeser, Robert W.; Van der Wolf, Kees; Strobel, Karen R.

In: Journal of School Psychology, Vol. 39, No. 2, 01.01.2001, p. 111-139.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - On the relation between social-emotional and school functioning during early adolescence preliminary findings from Dutch and American samples

AU - Roeser, Robert W.

AU - Van der Wolf, Kees

AU - Strobel, Karen R.

PY - 2001/1/1

Y1 - 2001/1/1

N2 - In this study, we used data collected from early adolescents (ages 12 to 14 years) in the San Francisco Bay area of the United States and Amsterdam, The Netherlands to examine two questions concerning their social-emotional and school functioning. First, we compared adolescents' self-reported emotional-behavioral problems, general self-esteem, and their sense that negative moods interfered with their ability to learn in school across the two samples. Consistent with previous research, we found that American youth reported more internalizing and externalizing problems than did their Dutch peers, and said that negative moods interfered more with their ability to learn in school. Second, we examined the relative predictive relations between adolescents’ social-emotional functioning and motivation to learn and their reported investment in or disaffection from school. Both sets of indices predicted investment in both samples, although the pattern of significant relations differed by country. Findings are discussed in relation to a broader model of the social, demographic, and psychological processes that shape patterns of academic investment or disaffection, achievement, and choice during the adolescent years.

AB - In this study, we used data collected from early adolescents (ages 12 to 14 years) in the San Francisco Bay area of the United States and Amsterdam, The Netherlands to examine two questions concerning their social-emotional and school functioning. First, we compared adolescents' self-reported emotional-behavioral problems, general self-esteem, and their sense that negative moods interfered with their ability to learn in school across the two samples. Consistent with previous research, we found that American youth reported more internalizing and externalizing problems than did their Dutch peers, and said that negative moods interfered more with their ability to learn in school. Second, we examined the relative predictive relations between adolescents’ social-emotional functioning and motivation to learn and their reported investment in or disaffection from school. Both sets of indices predicted investment in both samples, although the pattern of significant relations differed by country. Findings are discussed in relation to a broader model of the social, demographic, and psychological processes that shape patterns of academic investment or disaffection, achievement, and choice during the adolescent years.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=18044395907&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=18044395907&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0022-4405(01)00060-7

DO - 10.1016/S0022-4405(01)00060-7

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:18044395907

VL - 39

SP - 111

EP - 139

JO - Journal of School Psychology

JF - Journal of School Psychology

SN - 0022-4405

IS - 2

ER -