One country two peoples? Trends in the assimilation and separation of Hong Kong’s mainland-born population

David Post, Suet ling Pong, Dongshu Ou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article weighs the demographic evidence for either assimilation or separation among Hong Kong residents who were born in British Colonial Hong Kong or Mainland China. Using successive waves of Hong Kong census data from 1991 to 2011, we show the effects of nativity on four indicators of social distance and differentiation: residential segregation, linguistic assimilation, wage inequality and educational opportunity. On the one hand, there is some evidence of assimilation in terms of residential location and home language. On the other hand, in terms of wage inequality and access to postsecondary education, our findings suggest that Hong Kong’s population could become more divided depending upon birthplace.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)67-93
Number of pages27
JournalAsian Population Studies
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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assimilation
Hong Kong
wage
trend
social differentiation
social distance
educational opportunity
segregation
evidence
census
resident
linguistics
China
language
education

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Demography

Cite this

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One country two peoples? Trends in the assimilation and separation of Hong Kong’s mainland-born population. / Post, David; Pong, Suet ling; Ou, Dongshu.

In: Asian Population Studies, Vol. 11, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 67-93.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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