Opioid and Psychostimulant Plasticity: Targeting Overlap in Nucleus Accumbens Glutamate Signaling

Matthew Hearing, Nicholas Graziane, Yan Dong, Mark J. Thomas

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Commonalities in addictive behavior, such as craving, stimuli-driven drug seeking, and a high propensity for relapse following abstinence, have pushed for a unified theory of addiction that encompasses most abused substances. This unitary theory has recently been challenged – citing distinctions in structural neural plasticity, biochemical signaling, and neural circuitry to argue that addiction to opioids and psychostimulants is behaviorally and neurobiologically distinct. Recent more selective examination of drug-induced plasticity has highlighted that these two drug classes promote an overall reward circuitry signaling overlap through modifying excitatory synapses in the nucleus accumbens – a key constituent of the reward system. We discuss adaptations in presynaptic/postsynaptic and extrasynaptic glutamate signaling produced by opioids and psychostimulants, and their relevance to circuit remodeling and addiction-related behavior – arguing that these core neural adaptations are important targets for developing pharmacotherapies to treat addiction to multiple drugs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)276-294
Number of pages19
JournalTrends in Pharmacological Sciences
Volume39
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2018

Fingerprint

Nucleus Accumbens
Opioid Analgesics
Plasticity
Glutamic Acid
Reward
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Addictive Behavior
Drug therapy
Neuronal Plasticity
Synapses
Recurrence
Drug Therapy
Networks (circuits)

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Toxicology
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

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Opioid and Psychostimulant Plasticity : Targeting Overlap in Nucleus Accumbens Glutamate Signaling. / Hearing, Matthew; Graziane, Nicholas; Dong, Yan; Thomas, Mark J.

In: Trends in Pharmacological Sciences, Vol. 39, No. 3, 01.03.2018, p. 276-294.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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