Optical fiber modal noise in the 0.8 to 1.5 micron region and implications for near infrared precision radial velocity measurements

Keegan S. McCoy, Lawrence William Ramsey, Suvrath Mahadevan, Samuel Halverson, Stephen L. Redman

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Modal noise in fibers has been shown to limit the signal-to-noise ratio achievable in fiber-coupled, high-resolution spectrographs if it is not mitigated via modal scrambling techniques. Modal noise become significantly more important as the wavelength increases and presents a risk to the new generation of near-infrared precision radial spectrographs under construction or being proposed to search for planets around cool M-dwarf stars, which emit most of their light in the NIR. We present experimental results of tests at Penn State University characterizing modal noise in the far visible out to 1.5 microns and the degree of modal scrambling we obtained using mechanical scramblers. These efforts are part of a risk mitigation effort for the Habitable Zone Planet Finder spectrograph currently under development at Penn State University.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationGround-Based and Airborne Instrumentation for Astronomy IV
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2012
EventGround-Based and Airborne Instrumentation for Astronomy IV - Amsterdam, Netherlands
Duration: Jul 1 2012Jul 6 2012

Publication series

NameProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume8446
ISSN (Print)0277-786X

Other

OtherGround-Based and Airborne Instrumentation for Astronomy IV
CountryNetherlands
CityAmsterdam
Period7/1/127/6/12

Fingerprint

Radial velocity
Velocity Measurement
Spectrographs
Spectrograph
velocity measurement
radial velocity
Velocity measurement
Optical Fiber
spectrographs
Optical fibers
Infrared
optical fibers
Planets
Infrared radiation
planets
Fiber
dwarf stars
Optical fiber coupling
M stars
fibers

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

McCoy, K. S., Ramsey, L. W., Mahadevan, S., Halverson, S., & Redman, S. L. (2012). Optical fiber modal noise in the 0.8 to 1.5 micron region and implications for near infrared precision radial velocity measurements. In Ground-Based and Airborne Instrumentation for Astronomy IV [84468J] (Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering; Vol. 8446). https://doi.org/10.1117/12.926287
McCoy, Keegan S. ; Ramsey, Lawrence William ; Mahadevan, Suvrath ; Halverson, Samuel ; Redman, Stephen L. / Optical fiber modal noise in the 0.8 to 1.5 micron region and implications for near infrared precision radial velocity measurements. Ground-Based and Airborne Instrumentation for Astronomy IV. 2012. (Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering).
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abstract = "Modal noise in fibers has been shown to limit the signal-to-noise ratio achievable in fiber-coupled, high-resolution spectrographs if it is not mitigated via modal scrambling techniques. Modal noise become significantly more important as the wavelength increases and presents a risk to the new generation of near-infrared precision radial spectrographs under construction or being proposed to search for planets around cool M-dwarf stars, which emit most of their light in the NIR. We present experimental results of tests at Penn State University characterizing modal noise in the far visible out to 1.5 microns and the degree of modal scrambling we obtained using mechanical scramblers. These efforts are part of a risk mitigation effort for the Habitable Zone Planet Finder spectrograph currently under development at Penn State University.",
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McCoy, KS, Ramsey, LW, Mahadevan, S, Halverson, S & Redman, SL 2012, Optical fiber modal noise in the 0.8 to 1.5 micron region and implications for near infrared precision radial velocity measurements. in Ground-Based and Airborne Instrumentation for Astronomy IV., 84468J, Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering, vol. 8446, Ground-Based and Airborne Instrumentation for Astronomy IV, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 7/1/12. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.926287

Optical fiber modal noise in the 0.8 to 1.5 micron region and implications for near infrared precision radial velocity measurements. / McCoy, Keegan S.; Ramsey, Lawrence William; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Halverson, Samuel; Redman, Stephen L.

Ground-Based and Airborne Instrumentation for Astronomy IV. 2012. 84468J (Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering; Vol. 8446).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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McCoy KS, Ramsey LW, Mahadevan S, Halverson S, Redman SL. Optical fiber modal noise in the 0.8 to 1.5 micron region and implications for near infrared precision radial velocity measurements. In Ground-Based and Airborne Instrumentation for Astronomy IV. 2012. 84468J. (Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering). https://doi.org/10.1117/12.926287