Optimal power policy for energy harvesting transmitters with inefficient energy storage

Kaya Tutuncuoglu, Aylin Yener

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    28 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    An energy harvesting transmitter with an inefficient energy storage device, i.e., battery or capacitor, is considered, where a fraction of the stored energy is lost in the process. An optimal transmission policy maximizing the average rate within a finite time horizon is found for a given energy harvesting scenario. In contrast to previous results for optimal power allocations with energy harvesting transmitters, it is observed that storage losses encourage instantaneous consumption of harvested energy without storage for moderate harvest rates. It is also shown that this policy converges to the known constant power transmission policies when storage efficiency goes to unity. Based on the optimal offline policy, an online policy based on constant charging and discharging thresholds is proposed. The performance of the optimal offline and proposed online algorithms are simulated along with naive transmission policies, and the behavior of the algorithms for various storage efficiencies is discussed.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Title of host publication2012 46th Annual Conference on Information Sciences and Systems, CISS 2012
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 2012
    Event2012 46th Annual Conference on Information Sciences and Systems, CISS 2012 - Princeton, NJ, United States
    Duration: Mar 21 2012Mar 23 2012

    Publication series

    Name2012 46th Annual Conference on Information Sciences and Systems, CISS 2012

    Other

    Other2012 46th Annual Conference on Information Sciences and Systems, CISS 2012
    CountryUnited States
    CityPrinceton, NJ
    Period3/21/123/23/12

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Information Systems

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