Optimal Temperature Trajectory for Maximum Lithium Ion Battery Charge Acceptance

Mayank Garg, Christopher D. Rahn

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

Lithium ion (Li-ion) battery capacity selection for hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) is primarily based on charge/discharge power and life. At high temperatures, battery degradation increases and reduces battery life, but battery internal resistance reduces and improves battery performance. Lithium ion phosphate (LFP) batteries have a maximum allowable voltage limit based on degradation minimization, so the battery capacity is selected large enough to stay within the limit over the entire life of the pack. This paper develops an optimal temperature trajectory for LFP cells to improve their charge acceptance and reduce HEV pack size while maintaining battery life. The proposed algorithm has two strategies. First, the battery pack temperature is increased when its state of charge (SOC) is high because the cell is more likely to exceed maximum voltage limit at high SOC. Second, the battery pack temperature is increased if a high current pulse is expected because higher cell temperature reduces the internal resistance and the corresponding voltage swing. Simulations using experimentally validated battery performance and degradation models demonstrate that up to 30% battery pack size reduction is possible with real-time temperature control due to improved charge acceptance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalSAE Technical Papers
Volume2017-March
Issue numberMarch
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 28 2017
EventSAE World Congress Experience, WCX 2017 - Detroit, United States
Duration: Apr 4 2017Apr 6 2017

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Trajectories
Hybrid vehicles
Degradation
Electric potential
Temperature
Real time control
Temperature control
Phosphates
Lithium
Lithium-ion batteries
Ions

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Automotive Engineering
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Pollution
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

Cite this

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title = "Optimal Temperature Trajectory for Maximum Lithium Ion Battery Charge Acceptance",
abstract = "Lithium ion (Li-ion) battery capacity selection for hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) is primarily based on charge/discharge power and life. At high temperatures, battery degradation increases and reduces battery life, but battery internal resistance reduces and improves battery performance. Lithium ion phosphate (LFP) batteries have a maximum allowable voltage limit based on degradation minimization, so the battery capacity is selected large enough to stay within the limit over the entire life of the pack. This paper develops an optimal temperature trajectory for LFP cells to improve their charge acceptance and reduce HEV pack size while maintaining battery life. The proposed algorithm has two strategies. First, the battery pack temperature is increased when its state of charge (SOC) is high because the cell is more likely to exceed maximum voltage limit at high SOC. Second, the battery pack temperature is increased if a high current pulse is expected because higher cell temperature reduces the internal resistance and the corresponding voltage swing. Simulations using experimentally validated battery performance and degradation models demonstrate that up to 30{\%} battery pack size reduction is possible with real-time temperature control due to improved charge acceptance.",
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Optimal Temperature Trajectory for Maximum Lithium Ion Battery Charge Acceptance. / Garg, Mayank; Rahn, Christopher D.

In: SAE Technical Papers, Vol. 2017-March, No. March, 28.03.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

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AB - Lithium ion (Li-ion) battery capacity selection for hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) is primarily based on charge/discharge power and life. At high temperatures, battery degradation increases and reduces battery life, but battery internal resistance reduces and improves battery performance. Lithium ion phosphate (LFP) batteries have a maximum allowable voltage limit based on degradation minimization, so the battery capacity is selected large enough to stay within the limit over the entire life of the pack. This paper develops an optimal temperature trajectory for LFP cells to improve their charge acceptance and reduce HEV pack size while maintaining battery life. The proposed algorithm has two strategies. First, the battery pack temperature is increased when its state of charge (SOC) is high because the cell is more likely to exceed maximum voltage limit at high SOC. Second, the battery pack temperature is increased if a high current pulse is expected because higher cell temperature reduces the internal resistance and the corresponding voltage swing. Simulations using experimentally validated battery performance and degradation models demonstrate that up to 30% battery pack size reduction is possible with real-time temperature control due to improved charge acceptance.

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