Optimal timing of disease transmission in an age-structured population

Timothy Reluga, Jan Medlock, Eric Poolman, Alison P. Galvani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is a common medical folk-practice for parents to encourage their children to contract certain infectious diseases while they are young. This folk-practice is controversial, in part, because it contradicts the long-term public health goal of minimizing disease incidence. We study an epidemiological model of infectious disease in an age-structured population where virulence is age-dependent and show that, in some cases, the optimal behavior will increase disease transmission. This provides a rigorous justification of the concept of "endemic stability," and demonstrates that folk-practices may have been historically justified.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2711-2722
Number of pages12
JournalBulletin of Mathematical Biology
Volume69
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2007

Fingerprint

Age-structured Population
disease transmission
Infectious Diseases
infectious disease
infectious diseases
Communicable Diseases
Timing
Epidemiological Model
disease incidence
Public Health
virulence
Justification
epidemiological studies
Population
Virulence
public health
Epidemiologic Studies
Incidence
Parents
Dependent

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Reluga, Timothy ; Medlock, Jan ; Poolman, Eric ; Galvani, Alison P. / Optimal timing of disease transmission in an age-structured population. In: Bulletin of Mathematical Biology. 2007 ; Vol. 69, No. 8. pp. 2711-2722.
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Optimal timing of disease transmission in an age-structured population. / Reluga, Timothy; Medlock, Jan; Poolman, Eric; Galvani, Alison P.

In: Bulletin of Mathematical Biology, Vol. 69, No. 8, 01.11.2007, p. 2711-2722.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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