Optimization of flame synthesis for carbon nanotubes via supported catalysts

Randy Lee Vander Wal, G. M. Berger, L. J. Hall

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

The possibilities of flame synthesized growth of carbon nanotube (CNT) directly on a supporting substrate to be used in the final application are presented. Direct growth precludes detrimental, time-intensive processing steps and thus has great commercial viability. This approach was demonstrated using catalysts deposited upon SS meshes. Through choice of fuel based on C/H ratio and flame fuel/air equivalence ratio, a range of CO and H2 post-flame concentrations were realized. Within the boundaries established by ethane and acetylene fuels, a region was identified as conducive to CNT synthesis. Within this H2-CO concentration map, considerable variations in CNT yield and quality were observed. The base growth mechanism appears to dominate at low CO concentrations as very few catalyst particles are evident at CNT tips as observed in the SEM images for CO mole fractions < 0.1. In contrast, the higher CO concentrations result in tip growth where deposited catalyst particles and surface fragments become detached from the surface through breakup induced by surface carbide formation. The former mechanism has better potential for synthesis of CNT with uniform size and graphitic structure. With these criteria, using SEM and TEM imaging, CO and H2 mole fractions near 0.105 proved optimal. Such conditions are realized by using a premixed ethylene-air mixture of φ = 1.62. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 30th International Symposium on Combustion (Chicago, IL 7/25-30/2004).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Number of pages1
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004
Event30th International Symposium on Combustion, Abstracts of Works-in-Progress Poster Presentations - Chicago, IL, United States
Duration: Jul 25 2004Jul 30 2004

Other

Other30th International Symposium on Combustion, Abstracts of Works-in-Progress Poster Presentations
CountryUnited States
CityChicago, IL
Period7/25/047/30/04

Fingerprint

Flame synthesis
Catalyst supports
Carbon nanotubes
Catalysts
Scanning electron microscopy
Acetylene
Ethane
Air
Carbides
Ethylene
Transmission electron microscopy
Imaging techniques
Substrates
Processing

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Vander Wal, R. L., Berger, G. M., & Hall, L. J. (2004). Optimization of flame synthesis for carbon nanotubes via supported catalysts. Paper presented at 30th International Symposium on Combustion, Abstracts of Works-in-Progress Poster Presentations, Chicago, IL, United States.
Vander Wal, Randy Lee ; Berger, G. M. ; Hall, L. J. / Optimization of flame synthesis for carbon nanotubes via supported catalysts. Paper presented at 30th International Symposium on Combustion, Abstracts of Works-in-Progress Poster Presentations, Chicago, IL, United States.1 p.
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Vander Wal, RL, Berger, GM & Hall, LJ 2004, 'Optimization of flame synthesis for carbon nanotubes via supported catalysts' Paper presented at 30th International Symposium on Combustion, Abstracts of Works-in-Progress Poster Presentations, Chicago, IL, United States, 7/25/04 - 7/30/04, .

Optimization of flame synthesis for carbon nanotubes via supported catalysts. / Vander Wal, Randy Lee; Berger, G. M.; Hall, L. J.

2004. Paper presented at 30th International Symposium on Combustion, Abstracts of Works-in-Progress Poster Presentations, Chicago, IL, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

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Vander Wal RL, Berger GM, Hall LJ. Optimization of flame synthesis for carbon nanotubes via supported catalysts. 2004. Paper presented at 30th International Symposium on Combustion, Abstracts of Works-in-Progress Poster Presentations, Chicago, IL, United States.