Oral administration of analgesia and anxiolysis for pain associated with bone marrow biopsy

Giampaolo Talamo, Jiangang (Jason) Liao, Michael Bayerl, David Claxton, Maurizio Zangari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims: Medical literature provides only scarce data about the degree of pain experienced by patients undergoing a bone marrow aspiration and biopsy (BMAB), and little is known about the factors that can modify the perception of pain. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of a combination of analgesia and anxiolysis in reducing the pain score of patients undergoing BMAB. Materials and methods: Eighty-four consecutive adult patients underwent BMAB after local anesthesia with 5 mL of lidocaine hydrochloride 1% aqueous solution in the left posterior superior iliac crest. Analgesia was obtained with acetaminophen 650 mg and oxycodone 10 mg, and anxiolysis was obtained with lorazepam 2 mg, all drugs given once orally 30 min before the procedure. We assessed the pain level with the Wong-Baker Faces Pain Rating Scale, which distinguishes six levels of pain, from 0 to 5. Results: The 34 patients who received an oral administration of analgesia and anxiolysis reported pain at lower levels, i.e., in the range of 0-2, more frequently than the 50 patients who underwent BMAB without analgesia/anxiolysis (78% vs 64%, respectively). Among several predictors analyzed using a multivariate regression model, three were found to be associated with decreased pain level: the use of analgesia/anxiolysis, male sex, and increase in age (all with p values <0.05). Length of the extracted bone specimen, body mass index, and need of a spinal needle for anesthesia in obese patients did not predict for pain level. Conclusions: An oral administration of prophylactic regimen of analgesia and anxiolysis, at the above-mentioned doses, produced a statistically significant reduction of the perception of pain in patients undergoing BMAB, but its effect did not seem to provide a major and clinically significant reduction of pain level.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)301-305
Number of pages5
JournalSupportive Care in Cancer
Volume18
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2010

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Analgesia
Oral Administration
Bone Marrow
Needle Biopsy
Biopsy
Pain
Pain Perception
Oxycodone
Lorazepam
Facial Pain
Spinal Anesthesia
Local Anesthesia
Acetaminophen
Lidocaine
Needles
Body Mass Index
Bone and Bones
Pharmaceutical Preparations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology

Cite this

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title = "Oral administration of analgesia and anxiolysis for pain associated with bone marrow biopsy",
abstract = "Aims: Medical literature provides only scarce data about the degree of pain experienced by patients undergoing a bone marrow aspiration and biopsy (BMAB), and little is known about the factors that can modify the perception of pain. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of a combination of analgesia and anxiolysis in reducing the pain score of patients undergoing BMAB. Materials and methods: Eighty-four consecutive adult patients underwent BMAB after local anesthesia with 5 mL of lidocaine hydrochloride 1{\%} aqueous solution in the left posterior superior iliac crest. Analgesia was obtained with acetaminophen 650 mg and oxycodone 10 mg, and anxiolysis was obtained with lorazepam 2 mg, all drugs given once orally 30 min before the procedure. We assessed the pain level with the Wong-Baker Faces Pain Rating Scale, which distinguishes six levels of pain, from 0 to 5. Results: The 34 patients who received an oral administration of analgesia and anxiolysis reported pain at lower levels, i.e., in the range of 0-2, more frequently than the 50 patients who underwent BMAB without analgesia/anxiolysis (78{\%} vs 64{\%}, respectively). Among several predictors analyzed using a multivariate regression model, three were found to be associated with decreased pain level: the use of analgesia/anxiolysis, male sex, and increase in age (all with p values <0.05). Length of the extracted bone specimen, body mass index, and need of a spinal needle for anesthesia in obese patients did not predict for pain level. Conclusions: An oral administration of prophylactic regimen of analgesia and anxiolysis, at the above-mentioned doses, produced a statistically significant reduction of the perception of pain in patients undergoing BMAB, but its effect did not seem to provide a major and clinically significant reduction of pain level.",
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Oral administration of analgesia and anxiolysis for pain associated with bone marrow biopsy. / Talamo, Giampaolo; Liao, Jiangang (Jason); Bayerl, Michael; Claxton, David; Zangari, Maurizio.

In: Supportive Care in Cancer, Vol. 18, No. 3, 01.03.2010, p. 301-305.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Oral administration of analgesia and anxiolysis for pain associated with bone marrow biopsy

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AU - Liao, Jiangang (Jason)

AU - Bayerl, Michael

AU - Claxton, David

AU - Zangari, Maurizio

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