Oral baclofen administration in persons with chronic spinal cord injury does not prevent the protective effects of spasticity on body composition and glucose homeostasis

A. S. Gorgey, A. E. Chiodo, D. R. Gater

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study design: Correlation study. Objectives: To determine the effects of oral baclofen on body composition (fat mass (FM), fat-free mass (FFM)), extra- and intracellular fluid compartments and glucose homeostasis (plasma glucose and plasma insulin concentrations) in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) after controlling for spasticity. Settings: Laboratory settings at the University of Michigan, MI, USA. Methods: Fifteen individuals with chronic motor complete SCI (328 years old, 255 kg/m 2, C6-T11, American Spinal Injury Association A and B) underwent multifrequency bioelectrical impedance analysis to measure body composition and body fluid compartments. Spasticity of the hip, knee and ankle flexors and extensors was measured using a modified Ashworth Scale and the dose of daily oral baclofen was recorded. After overnight fasting, plasma glucose and insulin sensitivity were measured in response to an oral glucose tolerance test. Results: Oral baclofen dose was positively related to body mass index, but not to extensor or flexor spasticity. The dose of baclofen seemed to be correlated to extensor spasticity after considering spasticity per FFM. The increased dose of oral baclofen was positively associated with increased FFM, extra- and intracellular fluid compartments and total body water, but not with FM. Oral baclofen dose was negatively associated with the homeostatic model assessment index. Conclusion: Administration of oral baclofen did not attenuate the protective effects of spasticity on body composition and metabolic profile after SCI. The possibility that oral baclofen could exert an independent protective effect needs to be further investigated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)160-165
Number of pages6
JournalSpinal Cord
Volume48
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2010

Fingerprint

Baclofen
Body Composition
Spinal Cord Injuries
Oral Administration
Homeostasis
Glucose
Fats
Intracellular Fluid
Extracellular Fluid
Body Fluid Compartments
Metabolome
Body Water
Glucose Tolerance Test
Electric Impedance
Ankle
Insulin Resistance
Hip
Fasting
Knee
Body Mass Index

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

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abstract = "Study design: Correlation study. Objectives: To determine the effects of oral baclofen on body composition (fat mass (FM), fat-free mass (FFM)), extra- and intracellular fluid compartments and glucose homeostasis (plasma glucose and plasma insulin concentrations) in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) after controlling for spasticity. Settings: Laboratory settings at the University of Michigan, MI, USA. Methods: Fifteen individuals with chronic motor complete SCI (328 years old, 255 kg/m 2, C6-T11, American Spinal Injury Association A and B) underwent multifrequency bioelectrical impedance analysis to measure body composition and body fluid compartments. Spasticity of the hip, knee and ankle flexors and extensors was measured using a modified Ashworth Scale and the dose of daily oral baclofen was recorded. After overnight fasting, plasma glucose and insulin sensitivity were measured in response to an oral glucose tolerance test. Results: Oral baclofen dose was positively related to body mass index, but not to extensor or flexor spasticity. The dose of baclofen seemed to be correlated to extensor spasticity after considering spasticity per FFM. The increased dose of oral baclofen was positively associated with increased FFM, extra- and intracellular fluid compartments and total body water, but not with FM. Oral baclofen dose was negatively associated with the homeostatic model assessment index. Conclusion: Administration of oral baclofen did not attenuate the protective effects of spasticity on body composition and metabolic profile after SCI. The possibility that oral baclofen could exert an independent protective effect needs to be further investigated.",
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Oral baclofen administration in persons with chronic spinal cord injury does not prevent the protective effects of spasticity on body composition and glucose homeostasis. / Gorgey, A. S.; Chiodo, A. E.; Gater, D. R.

In: Spinal Cord, Vol. 48, No. 2, 01.02.2010, p. 160-165.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Oral baclofen administration in persons with chronic spinal cord injury does not prevent the protective effects of spasticity on body composition and glucose homeostasis

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AU - Chiodo, A. E.

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