Oral L-arginine improves hemodynamic response to stress and reduces plasma homocysteine in hypercholesterolemic men

Sheila G. West, Andrea Likos-Krick, Peter Brown, François Mariotti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

When administered intravenously, L-arginine substantially reduces blood pressure (BP) and peripheral vascular resistance in healthy adults and in patients with vascular disease. Oral L-arginine has been shown to improve endothelial function; however, it is not clear whether oral administration has significant effects on systemic hemodynamics. In a randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study we tested whether oral L-arginine (12 g/d for 3 wk) affected hemodynamics, glucose, insulin, or C-reactive protein in 16 middle-age men with hypercholesterolemia. After each treatment, hemodynamic variables were measured at rest and during 2 standardized Stressor tasks (a simulated public-speaking task and the cold pressor). Regardless of treatment, the stressor tasks increased BP and heart rate (P ≤ 0.02). Relative to placebo, L-arginine changed cardiac output (-0.4 L/m), diastolic BP (-1.9 mm Hg), pre-ejection period (+3.4 ms), and plasma homocysteine (-2.0 umol/L) (P ≤ 0.03). The change in plasma L-arginine was inversely correlated with the change in plasma homocysteine (r = -0.57, P = 0.03). Contrary to the results of previous studies of L-arginine administered intravenously, oral administration did not affect total peripheral resistance or plasma insulin. Oral L-arginine also did not affect plasma glucose, C-reactive protein, or lipids. This pattern of findings is consistent with the hypothesis that oral L-arginine reduces BP. This study is the first to describe a hemodynamic mechanism for the hypotensive effect of oral L-arginine and the first to show substantial reductions in homocysteine with oral administration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)212-217
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume135
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 1 2005

Fingerprint

Homocysteine
Arginine
Hemodynamics
Blood Pressure
Vascular Resistance
Oral Administration
C-Reactive Protein
Placebos
Insulin
Glucose
Hypercholesterolemia
Vascular Diseases
Cardiac Output
Cross-Over Studies
Heart Rate
Lipids
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

West, Sheila G. ; Likos-Krick, Andrea ; Brown, Peter ; Mariotti, François. / Oral L-arginine improves hemodynamic response to stress and reduces plasma homocysteine in hypercholesterolemic men. In: Journal of Nutrition. 2005 ; Vol. 135, No. 2. pp. 212-217.
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Oral L-arginine improves hemodynamic response to stress and reduces plasma homocysteine in hypercholesterolemic men. / West, Sheila G.; Likos-Krick, Andrea; Brown, Peter; Mariotti, François.

In: Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 135, No. 2, 01.02.2005, p. 212-217.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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