Organizational and Psychosocial Working Conditions and Their Relationship with Mental Health Outcomes in Patient-Care Workers

María Andrée López Gómez, Erika Sabbath, Leslie Boden, Jessica A.R. Williams, Karen Hopcia, Dean Hashimoto, Glorian Sorensen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective:The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between both psychosocial and organizational working conditions with self-reported mental health and mental health expenditures.Methods:This study used worker survey and medical claims data from a sample of 1594 patient-care workers from the Boston Hospital Workers Health Study (BHWHS) to assess the relationship of psychosocial (job demands, decision latitude, supervisor support, coworker support) and organizational (job flexibility, people-oriented culture) working conditions with mental health outcomes using validated toolsResults:People-oriented culture and coworker support were negatively correlated with psychological distress and were predictive of lower expenditures in mental health services. Job demands were positively correlated with psychological distress.Conclusions:Working conditions that promote trustful relationships and a cooperative work environment may render sustainable solutions to prevent ill mental health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)E480-E485
JournalJournal of occupational and environmental medicine
Volume61
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2019

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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