Origination and immigration drive latitudinal gradients in marine functional diversity

Sarah K. Berke, David Jablonski, Andrew Zachary Krug, James W. Valentine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Global patterns in the functional attributes of organisms are critical to understanding biodiversity trends and predicting biotic responses to environmental change. In the first global marine analysis, we find a strong decrease in functional richness, but a strong increase in functional evenness, with increasing latitude using intertidal-to-outer-shelf bivalves as a model system (N = 5571 species). These patterns appear to be driven by the interplay between variation in origination rates among functional groups, and latitudinal patterns in origination and range expansion, as documented by the rich fossil record of the group. The data suggest that (i) accumulation of taxa in spatial bins and functional categories has not impeded continued diversification in the tropics, and (ii) extinctions will influence ecosystem function differentially across latitudes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere101494
JournalPloS one
Volume9
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 18 2014

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Tropics
Bivalvia
Biodiversity
Emigration and Immigration
functional diversity
Bins
immigration
Ecosystems
Functional groups
Ecosystem
tropics
extinction
fossils
biodiversity
ecosystems
organisms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Berke, Sarah K. ; Jablonski, David ; Krug, Andrew Zachary ; Valentine, James W. / Origination and immigration drive latitudinal gradients in marine functional diversity. In: PloS one. 2014 ; Vol. 9, No. 7.
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Origination and immigration drive latitudinal gradients in marine functional diversity. / Berke, Sarah K.; Jablonski, David; Krug, Andrew Zachary; Valentine, James W.

In: PloS one, Vol. 9, No. 7, e101494, 18.07.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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