Osteomyelitis caused by Veillonella

Richard A. Barnhart, Michael R. Weitekamp, Robert Aber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Veillonella parvula and alcalescens are anaerobic gram-negative cocci that, when isolated from anaerobic cultures of clinical specimens, are usually regarded as commensal organisms. Occasionally they play a pathogenic role and require antibiotic therapy. Limited clinical experience and in vitro susceptibility studies suggest that penicillin G is the drug of choice for these organisms and that cephalosporins, clindamycin, chloramphenicol, and metronidazole may be acceptable therapeutic alternatives. Presented herein is a case report of a Veillonella infection, a discussion of the importance of these organisms when they occur in a clinical infection, and a discussion of the appropriate antibiotic therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)902-904
Number of pages3
JournalThe American Journal of Medicine
Volume74
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1983

Fingerprint

Veillonella
Osteomyelitis
Gram-Negative Anaerobic Cocci
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Penicillin G
Clindamycin
Metronidazole
Chloramphenicol
Cephalosporins
Infection
Therapeutics
Pharmaceutical Preparations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Barnhart, Richard A. ; Weitekamp, Michael R. ; Aber, Robert. / Osteomyelitis caused by Veillonella. In: The American Journal of Medicine. 1983 ; Vol. 74, No. 5. pp. 902-904.
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Osteomyelitis caused by Veillonella. / Barnhart, Richard A.; Weitekamp, Michael R.; Aber, Robert.

In: The American Journal of Medicine, Vol. 74, No. 5, 01.01.1983, p. 902-904.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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