Otopetrin 1 is required for otolith formation in the zebrafish Danio rerio

Inna Hughes, Brian Blasiole, David Huss, Mark E. Warchol, Nigam P. Rath, Belen Hurle, Elena Ignatova, J. David Dickman, Ruediger Thalmann, Robert Levenson, David M. Ornitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

57 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Orientation with respect to gravity is essential for the survival of complex organisms. The gravity receptor is one of the phylogenetically oldest sensory systems, and special adaptations that enhance sensitivity to gravity are highly conserved. The fish inner ear contains three large extracellular biomineral particles, otoliths, which have evolved to transduce the force of gravity into neuronal signals. Mammalian ears contain thousands of small particles called otoconia that serve a similar function. Loss or displacement of these structures can be lethal for fish and is responsible for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) in humans. The distinct morphologies of otoconial particles and otoliths suggest divergent developmental mechanisms. Mutations in a novel gene Otopetrin 1 (Otop1), encoding multi-transmembrane domain protein, result in nonsyndromic otoconial agenesis and a severe balance disorder in mice. Here we show that the zebrafish, Danio rerio, contains a highly conserved gene, otop1, that is essential for otolith formation. Morpholino-mediated knockdown of zebrafish Otop1 leads to otolith agenesis without affecting the sensory epithelium or other structures within the inner ear. Despite lack of otoliths in early development, otolith formation partially recovers in some fish after 2 days. However, the otoliths are malformed, misplaced, lack an organic matrix, and often consist of inorganic calcite crystals. These studies demonstrate that Otop1 has an essential and conserved role in the timing of formation and the size and shape of the developing otolith.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)391-402
Number of pages12
JournalDevelopmental biology
Volume276
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 15 2004

Fingerprint

Otolithic Membrane
Zebrafish
Gravitation
Fishes
Inner Ear
Morpholinos
Calcium Carbonate
Genes
Ear
Epithelium
Mutation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Molecular Biology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Hughes, I., Blasiole, B., Huss, D., Warchol, M. E., Rath, N. P., Hurle, B., ... Ornitz, D. M. (2004). Otopetrin 1 is required for otolith formation in the zebrafish Danio rerio. Developmental biology, 276(2), 391-402. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ydbio.2004.09.001
Hughes, Inna ; Blasiole, Brian ; Huss, David ; Warchol, Mark E. ; Rath, Nigam P. ; Hurle, Belen ; Ignatova, Elena ; David Dickman, J. ; Thalmann, Ruediger ; Levenson, Robert ; Ornitz, David M. / Otopetrin 1 is required for otolith formation in the zebrafish Danio rerio. In: Developmental biology. 2004 ; Vol. 276, No. 2. pp. 391-402.
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Hughes, I, Blasiole, B, Huss, D, Warchol, ME, Rath, NP, Hurle, B, Ignatova, E, David Dickman, J, Thalmann, R, Levenson, R & Ornitz, DM 2004, 'Otopetrin 1 is required for otolith formation in the zebrafish Danio rerio', Developmental biology, vol. 276, no. 2, pp. 391-402. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ydbio.2004.09.001

Otopetrin 1 is required for otolith formation in the zebrafish Danio rerio. / Hughes, Inna; Blasiole, Brian; Huss, David; Warchol, Mark E.; Rath, Nigam P.; Hurle, Belen; Ignatova, Elena; David Dickman, J.; Thalmann, Ruediger; Levenson, Robert; Ornitz, David M.

In: Developmental biology, Vol. 276, No. 2, 15.12.2004, p. 391-402.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Ignatova, Elena

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AU - Levenson, Robert

AU - Ornitz, David M.

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Hughes I, Blasiole B, Huss D, Warchol ME, Rath NP, Hurle B et al. Otopetrin 1 is required for otolith formation in the zebrafish Danio rerio. Developmental biology. 2004 Dec 15;276(2):391-402. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ydbio.2004.09.001