"Our market is our community"

Women farmers and civic agriculture in Pennsylvania, USA

Amy Trauger, Carolyn Elizabeth Sachs, Mary Ellen Barbercheck, Kathryn Jo Brasier, Nancy Ellen Kiernan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Civic agriculture is characterized in the literature as complementary and embedded social and economic strategies that provide economic benefits to farmers at the same time that they ostensibly provide socio-environmental benefits to the community. This paper presents some ways in which women farmers practice civic agriculture. The data come from in-depth interviews with women practicing agriculture in Pennsylvania. Some of the strategies women farmers use to make a living from the farm have little to do with food or agricultural products, but all are a product of the process of providing a living for farmers while meeting a social need in the community. Most of the women in our study also connect their business practices to their gender identity in rural and agricultural communities, and redefine successful farming in opposition to traditional views of economic rationality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)43-55
Number of pages13
JournalAgriculture and Human Values
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

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women in agriculture
agriculture
markets
economics
farmers
agricultural products
ecosystem services
interviews
foods
farming systems
farms
gender

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Agronomy and Crop Science

Cite this

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"Our market is our community" : Women farmers and civic agriculture in Pennsylvania, USA. / Trauger, Amy; Sachs, Carolyn Elizabeth; Barbercheck, Mary Ellen; Brasier, Kathryn Jo; Kiernan, Nancy Ellen.

In: Agriculture and Human Values, Vol. 27, No. 1, 01.01.2010, p. 43-55.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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