Outcome after open-heart surgery in infants and children

Geoffrey Miller, Johanna R. Tesman, Jeanette Ramer, Barry G. Baylen, John Myers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

74 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We have studied the neurodevelopmental outcome of 104 consecutive unselected children who underwent open-heart surgery from 1987 through 1989. Survivors had formal neurologic anti psychometric examinations after 2 years of age. Mean IQ was 90, and 78% had scores above 70. Cerebral palsy occurred in 22%. Deep hypothermia for longer than 45 minutes was associated with IQ less than 85 (P < .001) and later cerebral palsy (P = .02). Those less than 1 month old at operation had a median IQ of 96, and 25% had cerebral palsy. Median IQ for survivors of hypoplastic left heart syndrome was 66, only one had an IQ above 70, and 57% had cerebral palsy. Median IQ for transposition of great arteries was 109, only one was less than 85, anti all had normal neurologic examinations. Those between 1 and 6 months of age at operation had a median IQ of 93, with 64% above 85, and 5% had cerebral palsy. Those older than 6 months had a median IQ of 99, with 70% above 85, and 13% had cerebral palsy. For infants less than 1 month old at operation, a strong association existed between outcome, type of lesion, and duration of deep hypothermia (P < .01), although not in all cases. In those older than 1 month at operation, no association existed between outcome and any study variable. Although the majority of children have an uneventful outcome after open-heart surgery, a significant morbidity exists. This is related to several factors, including type of lesion and duration of hypothermia, particularly in neonates; preoperative congenital and acquired lesion; and possible perioperative cerebrovascular events.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)49-53
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Child Neurology
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996

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Cerebral Palsy
Thoracic Surgery
Hypothermia
Survivors
Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome
Transposition of Great Vessels
Neurologic Examination
Psychometrics
Nervous System
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Newborn Infant
Morbidity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Miller, Geoffrey ; Tesman, Johanna R. ; Ramer, Jeanette ; Baylen, Barry G. ; Myers, John. / Outcome after open-heart surgery in infants and children. In: Journal of Child Neurology. 1996 ; Vol. 11, No. 1. pp. 49-53.
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Outcome after open-heart surgery in infants and children. / Miller, Geoffrey; Tesman, Johanna R.; Ramer, Jeanette; Baylen, Barry G.; Myers, John.

In: Journal of Child Neurology, Vol. 11, No. 1, 01.01.1996, p. 49-53.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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