Outcomes of a Seven Practice Pilot in a Pay-For-Performance (P4P)-Based Program in Pennsylvania

Rhonda M. Johnson, Twyla Johnson, Sarah D. Zimmerman, Gary M. Marsh, Oralia Garcia-Dominic

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to examine how targeted six-month interventions impacted Best Practice/Patient Outcomes for minority patients receiving primary care in physician practices participating in a pay-for-performance (P4P) program.

METHODS: P4P Practices were invited to participate in a pilot intervention study designed to improve care for minority patients with hypertension, diabetes or pediatric asthma. Patient medical records were reviewed to assess how the interventions impacted (n=7 practices): Body mass index, diet and exercise, smoking, compliance with visits as recommended, blood pressure, sodium intake and weight management counseling, medication reconciliation, HbA1c testing, annual lipid profile, and anti-inflammatory medications.

RESULTS: Significant improvements in various clinical quality measures were observed in all seven practices. Of the 19 specified interventions, 13 were statistically significant at α=0.05 level and 14 met the target proportion. This suggests that the best practice intervention had a significant impact on some of the health care processes in the physician practices.

CONCLUSIONS: The most impactful interventions were those related to face-to-face educational discussions, patient medical chart documentations rather than those pertaining to medication adherence. Improvements in measuring reporting and recording of data at post-intervention were also observed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)139-148
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities
Volume2
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2015

Fingerprint

Incentive Reimbursement
Practice Guidelines
performance
Medication Reconciliation
medication
Medication Adherence
Primary Care Physicians
best practice
Documentation
Medical Records
Counseling
physician
Patient Care
minority
Body Mass Index
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Research Design
Asthma
Smoking
Sodium

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Anthropology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Johnson, Rhonda M. ; Johnson, Twyla ; Zimmerman, Sarah D. ; Marsh, Gary M. ; Garcia-Dominic, Oralia. / Outcomes of a Seven Practice Pilot in a Pay-For-Performance (P4P)-Based Program in Pennsylvania. In: Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities. 2015 ; Vol. 2, No. 1. pp. 139-148.
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Outcomes of a Seven Practice Pilot in a Pay-For-Performance (P4P)-Based Program in Pennsylvania. / Johnson, Rhonda M.; Johnson, Twyla; Zimmerman, Sarah D.; Marsh, Gary M.; Garcia-Dominic, Oralia.

In: Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities, Vol. 2, No. 1, 01.03.2015, p. 139-148.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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