Outcomes of Adolescent and Young Adults Receiving High Ligation and Mesh Repairs: A 16-Year Experience

Cory N. Criss, Nathan Gish, Joshua Gish, Benjamin Carr, Jennifer S. McLeod, Joseph T. Church, Lily Hsieh, Niki Matusko, James D. Geiger, Ronald B. Hirschl, Samir K. Gadepalli

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Introduction: Interestingly, the pediatric and adult surgeons perform vastly different operations in similar patient populations. Little is known about long-term recurrence and quality of life (QOL) in adolescents and young adults undergoing inguinal hernia repair. We evaluated long-term patient-centered outcomes in this population to determine the optimal operative approach. Methods: The medical records of patients 12-25 years old at the time of a primary inguinal hernia repair at our institution from 2000 to 2016 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients then completed a phone survey of their postoperative courses and QOL. Outcomes of high ligation performed by pediatric surgeons were compared to those of mesh repairs by adult general surgeons. The primary outcome was recurrence. Secondary outcomes included time to recurrence, postoperative complications, and patient-centered outcomes. A Cox regression analysis was used to determine associations for recurrence. Results: Of 213 patients identified, 143 (67.1%) were repaired by adult surgeons and 70 (32.9%) repaired by pediatric surgeons. Overall recurrence rate for the entire cohort was 5.7% with a median time to recurrence of 3.5 years (interquartile range 120-2155 days). High ligation and mesh repairs had similar rates of recurrence (6.3 versus 5.8, P = .57) and postoperative complications (17% versus 16%, P = .45). 101/213 (47%) patients completed the phone survey. Of those surveyed, 20% reported postoperative pain, 10% had residual numbness and tingling, and 10% of patients complained of intermittent bulging. Overall, a survey comparison showed no differences among subgroups. Conclusions: In adolescents and young adults, the long-term recurrence rate after inguinal hernia repair is ∼6% with time to recurrence approaching 4 years. Outcomes of high ligation and mesh repair are similar, highlighting the need for individualized approaches for this unique population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)223-228
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Laparoendoscopic and Advanced Surgical Techniques
Volume28
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2018

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Ligation
Young Adult
Recurrence
Inguinal Hernia
Herniorrhaphy
Pediatrics
Quality of Life
Population
Hypesthesia
Postoperative Pain
Medical Records
Regression Analysis
Surgeons
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

Criss, Cory N. ; Gish, Nathan ; Gish, Joshua ; Carr, Benjamin ; McLeod, Jennifer S. ; Church, Joseph T. ; Hsieh, Lily ; Matusko, Niki ; Geiger, James D. ; Hirschl, Ronald B. ; Gadepalli, Samir K. / Outcomes of Adolescent and Young Adults Receiving High Ligation and Mesh Repairs : A 16-Year Experience. In: Journal of Laparoendoscopic and Advanced Surgical Techniques. 2018 ; Vol. 28, No. 2. pp. 223-228.
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title = "Outcomes of Adolescent and Young Adults Receiving High Ligation and Mesh Repairs: A 16-Year Experience",
abstract = "Introduction: Interestingly, the pediatric and adult surgeons perform vastly different operations in similar patient populations. Little is known about long-term recurrence and quality of life (QOL) in adolescents and young adults undergoing inguinal hernia repair. We evaluated long-term patient-centered outcomes in this population to determine the optimal operative approach. Methods: The medical records of patients 12-25 years old at the time of a primary inguinal hernia repair at our institution from 2000 to 2016 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients then completed a phone survey of their postoperative courses and QOL. Outcomes of high ligation performed by pediatric surgeons were compared to those of mesh repairs by adult general surgeons. The primary outcome was recurrence. Secondary outcomes included time to recurrence, postoperative complications, and patient-centered outcomes. A Cox regression analysis was used to determine associations for recurrence. Results: Of 213 patients identified, 143 (67.1{\%}) were repaired by adult surgeons and 70 (32.9{\%}) repaired by pediatric surgeons. Overall recurrence rate for the entire cohort was 5.7{\%} with a median time to recurrence of 3.5 years (interquartile range 120-2155 days). High ligation and mesh repairs had similar rates of recurrence (6.3 versus 5.8, P = .57) and postoperative complications (17{\%} versus 16{\%}, P = .45). 101/213 (47{\%}) patients completed the phone survey. Of those surveyed, 20{\%} reported postoperative pain, 10{\%} had residual numbness and tingling, and 10{\%} of patients complained of intermittent bulging. Overall, a survey comparison showed no differences among subgroups. Conclusions: In adolescents and young adults, the long-term recurrence rate after inguinal hernia repair is ∼6{\%} with time to recurrence approaching 4 years. Outcomes of high ligation and mesh repair are similar, highlighting the need for individualized approaches for this unique population.",
author = "Criss, {Cory N.} and Nathan Gish and Joshua Gish and Benjamin Carr and McLeod, {Jennifer S.} and Church, {Joseph T.} and Lily Hsieh and Niki Matusko and Geiger, {James D.} and Hirschl, {Ronald B.} and Gadepalli, {Samir K.}",
year = "2018",
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doi = "10.1089/lap.2017.0511",
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Criss, CN, Gish, N, Gish, J, Carr, B, McLeod, JS, Church, JT, Hsieh, L, Matusko, N, Geiger, JD, Hirschl, RB & Gadepalli, SK 2018, 'Outcomes of Adolescent and Young Adults Receiving High Ligation and Mesh Repairs: A 16-Year Experience', Journal of Laparoendoscopic and Advanced Surgical Techniques, vol. 28, no. 2, pp. 223-228. https://doi.org/10.1089/lap.2017.0511

Outcomes of Adolescent and Young Adults Receiving High Ligation and Mesh Repairs : A 16-Year Experience. / Criss, Cory N.; Gish, Nathan; Gish, Joshua; Carr, Benjamin; McLeod, Jennifer S.; Church, Joseph T.; Hsieh, Lily; Matusko, Niki; Geiger, James D.; Hirschl, Ronald B.; Gadepalli, Samir K.

In: Journal of Laparoendoscopic and Advanced Surgical Techniques, Vol. 28, No. 2, 01.02.2018, p. 223-228.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Outcomes of Adolescent and Young Adults Receiving High Ligation and Mesh Repairs

T2 - A 16-Year Experience

AU - Criss, Cory N.

AU - Gish, Nathan

AU - Gish, Joshua

AU - Carr, Benjamin

AU - McLeod, Jennifer S.

AU - Church, Joseph T.

AU - Hsieh, Lily

AU - Matusko, Niki

AU - Geiger, James D.

AU - Hirschl, Ronald B.

AU - Gadepalli, Samir K.

PY - 2018/2/1

Y1 - 2018/2/1

N2 - Introduction: Interestingly, the pediatric and adult surgeons perform vastly different operations in similar patient populations. Little is known about long-term recurrence and quality of life (QOL) in adolescents and young adults undergoing inguinal hernia repair. We evaluated long-term patient-centered outcomes in this population to determine the optimal operative approach. Methods: The medical records of patients 12-25 years old at the time of a primary inguinal hernia repair at our institution from 2000 to 2016 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients then completed a phone survey of their postoperative courses and QOL. Outcomes of high ligation performed by pediatric surgeons were compared to those of mesh repairs by adult general surgeons. The primary outcome was recurrence. Secondary outcomes included time to recurrence, postoperative complications, and patient-centered outcomes. A Cox regression analysis was used to determine associations for recurrence. Results: Of 213 patients identified, 143 (67.1%) were repaired by adult surgeons and 70 (32.9%) repaired by pediatric surgeons. Overall recurrence rate for the entire cohort was 5.7% with a median time to recurrence of 3.5 years (interquartile range 120-2155 days). High ligation and mesh repairs had similar rates of recurrence (6.3 versus 5.8, P = .57) and postoperative complications (17% versus 16%, P = .45). 101/213 (47%) patients completed the phone survey. Of those surveyed, 20% reported postoperative pain, 10% had residual numbness and tingling, and 10% of patients complained of intermittent bulging. Overall, a survey comparison showed no differences among subgroups. Conclusions: In adolescents and young adults, the long-term recurrence rate after inguinal hernia repair is ∼6% with time to recurrence approaching 4 years. Outcomes of high ligation and mesh repair are similar, highlighting the need for individualized approaches for this unique population.

AB - Introduction: Interestingly, the pediatric and adult surgeons perform vastly different operations in similar patient populations. Little is known about long-term recurrence and quality of life (QOL) in adolescents and young adults undergoing inguinal hernia repair. We evaluated long-term patient-centered outcomes in this population to determine the optimal operative approach. Methods: The medical records of patients 12-25 years old at the time of a primary inguinal hernia repair at our institution from 2000 to 2016 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients then completed a phone survey of their postoperative courses and QOL. Outcomes of high ligation performed by pediatric surgeons were compared to those of mesh repairs by adult general surgeons. The primary outcome was recurrence. Secondary outcomes included time to recurrence, postoperative complications, and patient-centered outcomes. A Cox regression analysis was used to determine associations for recurrence. Results: Of 213 patients identified, 143 (67.1%) were repaired by adult surgeons and 70 (32.9%) repaired by pediatric surgeons. Overall recurrence rate for the entire cohort was 5.7% with a median time to recurrence of 3.5 years (interquartile range 120-2155 days). High ligation and mesh repairs had similar rates of recurrence (6.3 versus 5.8, P = .57) and postoperative complications (17% versus 16%, P = .45). 101/213 (47%) patients completed the phone survey. Of those surveyed, 20% reported postoperative pain, 10% had residual numbness and tingling, and 10% of patients complained of intermittent bulging. Overall, a survey comparison showed no differences among subgroups. Conclusions: In adolescents and young adults, the long-term recurrence rate after inguinal hernia repair is ∼6% with time to recurrence approaching 4 years. Outcomes of high ligation and mesh repair are similar, highlighting the need for individualized approaches for this unique population.

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U2 - 10.1089/lap.2017.0511

DO - 10.1089/lap.2017.0511

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