Outcomes of low-weight patients with avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder and anorexia nervosa at long-term follow-up after treatment in a partial hospitalization program for eating disorders

Amanda E. Bryson, Anna M. Scipioni, Jamal Essayli, Johnna R. Mahoney, Rollyn Ornstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To assess long-term outcomes of patients with avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID) treated in a partial hospitalization program (PHP) for eating disorders (ED). Method: A cross-sectional study comparing patients with ARFID to those with anorexia nervosa (AN) who had been discharged from a PHP for at least 12 months was performed. Percent median body mass index (%MBMI), scores on the Children's Eating Attitudes Test (ChEAT), and treatment utilization were assessed, with intake and discharge data collected via retrospective chart review. Results: Of the 137 eligible patients, 62 (45.3%) consented to follow-up data collection. Patients with ARFID and AN exhibited similar increases in %MBMI from intake to discharge and reported low scores on the ChEAT by discharge. Patients with ARFID and AN maintained good weight outcomes and low ChEAT scores at follow-up. Most participants were still receiving outpatient treatment from a variety of providers, although fewer with ARFID than AN continued to receive services from our multidisciplinary ED clinic. Discussion: Patients with ARFID and AN exhibit similar improvements in %MBMI when treated in the same PHP and appear to maintain treatment gains at long-term follow-up. Additionally, most patients continue to utilize outpatient services after being discharged from a PHP.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)470-474
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of Eating Disorders
Volume51
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2018

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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