Overestimation of Physical Abilities Among Boys With and Without ADHD

Sarah A. Helseth, Beth S. Bruce, Daniel A. Waschbusch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Children with ADHD have been widely reported to overestimate their abilities in social and academic domains, but a similar overestimation of physical abilities has not been examined. Method: Twenty-four elementary school-age boys with ADHD and fifteen boys without ADHD were compared on their ability to accurately estimate their ability to complete four lab-based physical tasks, varying on three levels of difficulty: (a) within their ability, (b) 8% beyond their ability, and (c) 13% beyond their ability. Results: Children with ADHD were significantly more likely than controls to overestimate their physical ability at difficult levels of the task. Conclusion: Implications of these results for preventing risky behaviors in children with ADHD are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)163-167
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Attention Disorders
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

Fingerprint

Aptitude
Child Behavior

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

@article{ed0162f1ee9d4488b5069f8a65619192,
title = "Overestimation of Physical Abilities Among Boys With and Without ADHD",
abstract = "Objective: Children with ADHD have been widely reported to overestimate their abilities in social and academic domains, but a similar overestimation of physical abilities has not been examined. Method: Twenty-four elementary school-age boys with ADHD and fifteen boys without ADHD were compared on their ability to accurately estimate their ability to complete four lab-based physical tasks, varying on three levels of difficulty: (a) within their ability, (b) 8{\%} beyond their ability, and (c) 13{\%} beyond their ability. Results: Children with ADHD were significantly more likely than controls to overestimate their physical ability at difficult levels of the task. Conclusion: Implications of these results for preventing risky behaviors in children with ADHD are discussed.",
author = "Helseth, {Sarah A.} and Bruce, {Beth S.} and Waschbusch, {Daniel A.}",
year = "2016",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/1087054713496463",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "20",
pages = "163--167",
journal = "Journal of Attention Disorders",
issn = "1087-0547",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "2",

}

Overestimation of Physical Abilities Among Boys With and Without ADHD. / Helseth, Sarah A.; Bruce, Beth S.; Waschbusch, Daniel A.

In: Journal of Attention Disorders, Vol. 20, No. 2, 01.02.2016, p. 163-167.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Overestimation of Physical Abilities Among Boys With and Without ADHD

AU - Helseth, Sarah A.

AU - Bruce, Beth S.

AU - Waschbusch, Daniel A.

PY - 2016/2/1

Y1 - 2016/2/1

N2 - Objective: Children with ADHD have been widely reported to overestimate their abilities in social and academic domains, but a similar overestimation of physical abilities has not been examined. Method: Twenty-four elementary school-age boys with ADHD and fifteen boys without ADHD were compared on their ability to accurately estimate their ability to complete four lab-based physical tasks, varying on three levels of difficulty: (a) within their ability, (b) 8% beyond their ability, and (c) 13% beyond their ability. Results: Children with ADHD were significantly more likely than controls to overestimate their physical ability at difficult levels of the task. Conclusion: Implications of these results for preventing risky behaviors in children with ADHD are discussed.

AB - Objective: Children with ADHD have been widely reported to overestimate their abilities in social and academic domains, but a similar overestimation of physical abilities has not been examined. Method: Twenty-four elementary school-age boys with ADHD and fifteen boys without ADHD were compared on their ability to accurately estimate their ability to complete four lab-based physical tasks, varying on three levels of difficulty: (a) within their ability, (b) 8% beyond their ability, and (c) 13% beyond their ability. Results: Children with ADHD were significantly more likely than controls to overestimate their physical ability at difficult levels of the task. Conclusion: Implications of these results for preventing risky behaviors in children with ADHD are discussed.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84954307719&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84954307719&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/1087054713496463

DO - 10.1177/1087054713496463

M3 - Article

C2 - 23881557

AN - SCOPUS:84954307719

VL - 20

SP - 163

EP - 167

JO - Journal of Attention Disorders

JF - Journal of Attention Disorders

SN - 1087-0547

IS - 2

ER -