Overlapping patchworks of mountain agriculture in Peru and Bolivia

Toward a regional-global landscape model

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

66 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Overlapping patchworks of farm spatial units are characteristic of the mountain landscapes of Andean regions of Peru and Bolivia. Patchiness and overlap (200-600 m) are shaped by the broad tolerances of major crops, high variability/low predictability of habitat factors, multifaceted cropping rationales of cultivators including their linkages to extraregional influences, and, to varying extents, the sociospatial coordination of crop choice among farmers. Indian peasant farmers manage overlapping patchworks using a concept of farm spaces as loosely bounded. They apply a naming system to farm spatial units based primarily on topographic features in order to serve their cultural, social, and political purposes. Key processes suggest a regional-global model of overlapping patchworks. The model elucidates the roles of landscape flexibility and uncertainty in conservation-with-development. Implications are shown by farm units of diverse food plants and prospects for in situ conservation. Findings caution against universality of the zone model of mountain agriculture.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)135-188
Number of pages54
JournalHuman Ecology
Volume27
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999

Fingerprint

Bolivia
Peru
farm
agriculture
mountain
farmer
conservation
Andean Region
crop
patchiness
peasant
habitat
tolerance
cropping practice
flexibility
uncertainty
food
Farm
Patchwork
Agriculture

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology
  • Anthropology
  • Environmental Science (miscellaneous)
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

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abstract = "Overlapping patchworks of farm spatial units are characteristic of the mountain landscapes of Andean regions of Peru and Bolivia. Patchiness and overlap (200-600 m) are shaped by the broad tolerances of major crops, high variability/low predictability of habitat factors, multifaceted cropping rationales of cultivators including their linkages to extraregional influences, and, to varying extents, the sociospatial coordination of crop choice among farmers. Indian peasant farmers manage overlapping patchworks using a concept of farm spaces as loosely bounded. They apply a naming system to farm spatial units based primarily on topographic features in order to serve their cultural, social, and political purposes. Key processes suggest a regional-global model of overlapping patchworks. The model elucidates the roles of landscape flexibility and uncertainty in conservation-with-development. Implications are shown by farm units of diverse food plants and prospects for in situ conservation. Findings caution against universality of the zone model of mountain agriculture.",
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Overlapping patchworks of mountain agriculture in Peru and Bolivia : Toward a regional-global landscape model. / Zimmerer, Karl Stephen.

In: Human Ecology, Vol. 27, No. 1, 01.01.1999, p. 135-188.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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