Overweight and average-weight children equally responsive to "Kids Choice Program" to increase fruit and vegetable consumption

Helen M. Hendy, Keith Williams, Thomas S. Camise, Sandra Alderman, Jonathan William Ivy, Jessica Reed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Secondary analyses were conducted for children participating in the school-based Kids Choice Program [Hendy, H. M., Williams, K., & Camise, T. (2005). "Kids Choice" school lunch program increases children's fruit and vegetable acceptance. Appetite, 45, 250-263.] to examine whether fruit and vegetable consumption and preference ratings by overweight and average-weight children within the original sample were equally responsive to the program. The Kids Choice Program produced increased fruit and vegetable consumption by both overweight and average-weight children that lasted throughout the month-long program, while avoiding "over-justification" drops in later fruit and vegetable preference ratings. We believe that the Kids Choice Program shows promise for encouraging overweight children to improve nutrition and weight management behaviors while in their everyday peer environment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)683-686
Number of pages4
JournalAppetite
Volume49
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2007

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Vegetables
Fruit
Weights and Measures
Lunch
Appetite

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

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Overweight and average-weight children equally responsive to "Kids Choice Program" to increase fruit and vegetable consumption. / Hendy, Helen M.; Williams, Keith; Camise, Thomas S.; Alderman, Sandra; Ivy, Jonathan William; Reed, Jessica.

In: Appetite, Vol. 49, No. 3, 01.11.2007, p. 683-686.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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