Overweight modifies the association between long-term ambient air pollution and prehypertension in Chinese adults: The 33 Communities Chinese Health Study

Bo Yi Yang, Zhengmin Min Qian, Michael G. Vaughn, Steven W. Howard, John Phillip Pemberton, Huimin Ma, Duo Hong Chen, Li Wen Hu, Xiao Wen Zeng, Chuan Zhang, Yan Peng Tian, Min Nian, Xiang Xiao, Guang Hui Dong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Research regarding the interaction of ambient air pollution and overweight on prehypertension is scarce. We aimed to test whether overweight modifies the association between long-term exposure to ambient air pollution and prehypertension in Chinese adults. Methods: A total of 16,188 Chinese adults, aged 18-74 years old, from 33 communities in 3 Northeastern Chinese cities were evaluated. Three-year average levels of particles with an aerodynamic diameter ≤ 10 μm (PM10), sulfur dioxides (SO2), nitrogen dioxides (NO2), and ozone (O3) were calculated at monitoring stations. Generalized additive models and 2-level regression analyses were applied. Results: We observed significant interactions between air pollutants and overweight on prehypertension and blood pressure. The associations of PM10, SO2, NO2, and O3 with prehypertension were significant among overweight participants (Prevalence Rate Ratios (PRRs) per interquartile range (IQR) of air pollutants: 1.14-1.20), but not among normal weight participants (PRRs: 0.98-1.04). PM10, SO2, and O3 were significantly associated with systolic blood pressure (SBP), and the magnitudes of these associations were higher among overweight adults (increases in SBP per IQR of air pollutants: 1.82-4.53 mmHg) than those among normal weight adults (increases in SBP: 0.42-0.61 mmHg). For diastolic blood pressure (DBP), significant associations were mainly observed in overweight participants (increases in DBP: 0.80-1.63 mmHg). Further stratified analyses showed that all these interactions were stronger in women, the older, and participants living in areas with lower income levels or higher population density. Conclusions: Being overweight may enhance the effects of ambient air pollution on prehypertension and blood pressure in Chinese adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number57
JournalEnvironmental Health: A Global Access Science Source
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 28 2018

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Prehypertension
Air Pollution
Blood Pressure
Health
Air Pollutants
Nitrogen Dioxide
Weights and Measures
Sulfur Dioxide
Ozone
Population Density

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Yang, Bo Yi ; Qian, Zhengmin Min ; Vaughn, Michael G. ; Howard, Steven W. ; Pemberton, John Phillip ; Ma, Huimin ; Chen, Duo Hong ; Hu, Li Wen ; Zeng, Xiao Wen ; Zhang, Chuan ; Tian, Yan Peng ; Nian, Min ; Xiao, Xiang ; Dong, Guang Hui. / Overweight modifies the association between long-term ambient air pollution and prehypertension in Chinese adults : The 33 Communities Chinese Health Study. In: Environmental Health: A Global Access Science Source. 2018 ; Vol. 17, No. 1.
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title = "Overweight modifies the association between long-term ambient air pollution and prehypertension in Chinese adults: The 33 Communities Chinese Health Study",
abstract = "Background: Research regarding the interaction of ambient air pollution and overweight on prehypertension is scarce. We aimed to test whether overweight modifies the association between long-term exposure to ambient air pollution and prehypertension in Chinese adults. Methods: A total of 16,188 Chinese adults, aged 18-74 years old, from 33 communities in 3 Northeastern Chinese cities were evaluated. Three-year average levels of particles with an aerodynamic diameter ≤ 10 μm (PM10), sulfur dioxides (SO2), nitrogen dioxides (NO2), and ozone (O3) were calculated at monitoring stations. Generalized additive models and 2-level regression analyses were applied. Results: We observed significant interactions between air pollutants and overweight on prehypertension and blood pressure. The associations of PM10, SO2, NO2, and O3 with prehypertension were significant among overweight participants (Prevalence Rate Ratios (PRRs) per interquartile range (IQR) of air pollutants: 1.14-1.20), but not among normal weight participants (PRRs: 0.98-1.04). PM10, SO2, and O3 were significantly associated with systolic blood pressure (SBP), and the magnitudes of these associations were higher among overweight adults (increases in SBP per IQR of air pollutants: 1.82-4.53 mmHg) than those among normal weight adults (increases in SBP: 0.42-0.61 mmHg). For diastolic blood pressure (DBP), significant associations were mainly observed in overweight participants (increases in DBP: 0.80-1.63 mmHg). Further stratified analyses showed that all these interactions were stronger in women, the older, and participants living in areas with lower income levels or higher population density. Conclusions: Being overweight may enhance the effects of ambient air pollution on prehypertension and blood pressure in Chinese adults.",
author = "Yang, {Bo Yi} and Qian, {Zhengmin Min} and Vaughn, {Michael G.} and Howard, {Steven W.} and Pemberton, {John Phillip} and Huimin Ma and Chen, {Duo Hong} and Hu, {Li Wen} and Zeng, {Xiao Wen} and Chuan Zhang and Tian, {Yan Peng} and Min Nian and Xiang Xiao and Dong, {Guang Hui}",
year = "2018",
month = "6",
day = "28",
doi = "10.1186/s12940-018-0401-2",
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Overweight modifies the association between long-term ambient air pollution and prehypertension in Chinese adults : The 33 Communities Chinese Health Study. / Yang, Bo Yi; Qian, Zhengmin Min; Vaughn, Michael G.; Howard, Steven W.; Pemberton, John Phillip; Ma, Huimin; Chen, Duo Hong; Hu, Li Wen; Zeng, Xiao Wen; Zhang, Chuan; Tian, Yan Peng; Nian, Min; Xiao, Xiang; Dong, Guang Hui.

In: Environmental Health: A Global Access Science Source, Vol. 17, No. 1, 57, 28.06.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Overweight modifies the association between long-term ambient air pollution and prehypertension in Chinese adults

T2 - The 33 Communities Chinese Health Study

AU - Yang, Bo Yi

AU - Qian, Zhengmin Min

AU - Vaughn, Michael G.

AU - Howard, Steven W.

AU - Pemberton, John Phillip

AU - Ma, Huimin

AU - Chen, Duo Hong

AU - Hu, Li Wen

AU - Zeng, Xiao Wen

AU - Zhang, Chuan

AU - Tian, Yan Peng

AU - Nian, Min

AU - Xiao, Xiang

AU - Dong, Guang Hui

PY - 2018/6/28

Y1 - 2018/6/28

N2 - Background: Research regarding the interaction of ambient air pollution and overweight on prehypertension is scarce. We aimed to test whether overweight modifies the association between long-term exposure to ambient air pollution and prehypertension in Chinese adults. Methods: A total of 16,188 Chinese adults, aged 18-74 years old, from 33 communities in 3 Northeastern Chinese cities were evaluated. Three-year average levels of particles with an aerodynamic diameter ≤ 10 μm (PM10), sulfur dioxides (SO2), nitrogen dioxides (NO2), and ozone (O3) were calculated at monitoring stations. Generalized additive models and 2-level regression analyses were applied. Results: We observed significant interactions between air pollutants and overweight on prehypertension and blood pressure. The associations of PM10, SO2, NO2, and O3 with prehypertension were significant among overweight participants (Prevalence Rate Ratios (PRRs) per interquartile range (IQR) of air pollutants: 1.14-1.20), but not among normal weight participants (PRRs: 0.98-1.04). PM10, SO2, and O3 were significantly associated with systolic blood pressure (SBP), and the magnitudes of these associations were higher among overweight adults (increases in SBP per IQR of air pollutants: 1.82-4.53 mmHg) than those among normal weight adults (increases in SBP: 0.42-0.61 mmHg). For diastolic blood pressure (DBP), significant associations were mainly observed in overweight participants (increases in DBP: 0.80-1.63 mmHg). Further stratified analyses showed that all these interactions were stronger in women, the older, and participants living in areas with lower income levels or higher population density. Conclusions: Being overweight may enhance the effects of ambient air pollution on prehypertension and blood pressure in Chinese adults.

AB - Background: Research regarding the interaction of ambient air pollution and overweight on prehypertension is scarce. We aimed to test whether overweight modifies the association between long-term exposure to ambient air pollution and prehypertension in Chinese adults. Methods: A total of 16,188 Chinese adults, aged 18-74 years old, from 33 communities in 3 Northeastern Chinese cities were evaluated. Three-year average levels of particles with an aerodynamic diameter ≤ 10 μm (PM10), sulfur dioxides (SO2), nitrogen dioxides (NO2), and ozone (O3) were calculated at monitoring stations. Generalized additive models and 2-level regression analyses were applied. Results: We observed significant interactions between air pollutants and overweight on prehypertension and blood pressure. The associations of PM10, SO2, NO2, and O3 with prehypertension were significant among overweight participants (Prevalence Rate Ratios (PRRs) per interquartile range (IQR) of air pollutants: 1.14-1.20), but not among normal weight participants (PRRs: 0.98-1.04). PM10, SO2, and O3 were significantly associated with systolic blood pressure (SBP), and the magnitudes of these associations were higher among overweight adults (increases in SBP per IQR of air pollutants: 1.82-4.53 mmHg) than those among normal weight adults (increases in SBP: 0.42-0.61 mmHg). For diastolic blood pressure (DBP), significant associations were mainly observed in overweight participants (increases in DBP: 0.80-1.63 mmHg). Further stratified analyses showed that all these interactions were stronger in women, the older, and participants living in areas with lower income levels or higher population density. Conclusions: Being overweight may enhance the effects of ambient air pollution on prehypertension and blood pressure in Chinese adults.

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U2 - 10.1186/s12940-018-0401-2

DO - 10.1186/s12940-018-0401-2

M3 - Article

C2 - 29954383

AN - SCOPUS:85049159203

VL - 17

JO - Environmental Health: A Global Access Science Source

JF - Environmental Health: A Global Access Science Source

SN - 1476-069X

IS - 1

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