Oxidative stress and antioxidant status in intensely exercising horses administered nutraceutical extracts

Danielle Smarsh, N. Liburt, J. Streltsova, K. McKeever, C. A. Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Reasons for performing study: Many nutraceuticals are used as equine supplements without their efficacy having been scientifically tested. Black tea, cranberries, orange peel and ginger are a few of those nutraceuticals that warrant further study.Objective: To test the effects of single doses of black tea, cranberry, orange peel and ginger extract on markers of oxidative stress and antioxidant status following exercise in horses. Methods: In Study 1, 9 mature, healthy but unfit Standardbred mares were administered 2 l of a control (water), orange peel extract (30 g extract) or decaffeinated black tea extract (28 g extract). In Study 2 the same mares were administered 2 l of a control (water), cranberry extract (30 g extract) or ginger extract (30 g extract). In each study, mares were given the extracts via nasogastric tube 1 h before performing a graded exercise test (GXT), in a randomised crossover design with at least 7 days between GXTs. Blood samples were collected at rest, at fatigue, and 1 and 24 h post exercise and analysed for lipid hydroperoxides (LPO), total glutathione (GSH-T), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), α-tocopherol (TOC), β-carotene (BC) and retinol. Data were statistically analysed using a repeated measures ANOVA. Results: In Study 1 there was no effect of treatment for LPO, GSH-T, GPx, TOC or BC. Retinol was higher for both tea (P = 0.0006) and water (P = 0.004) than for orange peel. In Study 2 there was no treatment effect for LPO, GPx, GSH-T, RET, BC or TOC.Conclusions: The results show that a single dose of various nutraceuticals in exercising horses do not produce an effect on either oxidative stress or antioxidant status and further investigation is needed as to whether long-term supplementation would enhance these effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)317-322
Number of pages6
JournalEquine Veterinary Journal
Volume42
Issue numberSUPPL. 38
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2010

Fingerprint

Vaccinium macrocarpon
Tea
Dietary Supplements
Ginger
functional foods
Horses
Tocopherols
Lipid Peroxides
Oxidative Stress
oxidative stress
Glutathione Peroxidase
Antioxidants
antioxidants
horses
extracts
orange peels
Vitamin A
Water
cranberries
black tea

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Equine

Cite this

Smarsh, Danielle ; Liburt, N. ; Streltsova, J. ; McKeever, K. ; Williams, C. A. / Oxidative stress and antioxidant status in intensely exercising horses administered nutraceutical extracts. In: Equine Veterinary Journal. 2010 ; Vol. 42, No. SUPPL. 38. pp. 317-322.
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abstract = "Reasons for performing study: Many nutraceuticals are used as equine supplements without their efficacy having been scientifically tested. Black tea, cranberries, orange peel and ginger are a few of those nutraceuticals that warrant further study.Objective: To test the effects of single doses of black tea, cranberry, orange peel and ginger extract on markers of oxidative stress and antioxidant status following exercise in horses. Methods: In Study 1, 9 mature, healthy but unfit Standardbred mares were administered 2 l of a control (water), orange peel extract (30 g extract) or decaffeinated black tea extract (28 g extract). In Study 2 the same mares were administered 2 l of a control (water), cranberry extract (30 g extract) or ginger extract (30 g extract). In each study, mares were given the extracts via nasogastric tube 1 h before performing a graded exercise test (GXT), in a randomised crossover design with at least 7 days between GXTs. Blood samples were collected at rest, at fatigue, and 1 and 24 h post exercise and analysed for lipid hydroperoxides (LPO), total glutathione (GSH-T), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), α-tocopherol (TOC), β-carotene (BC) and retinol. Data were statistically analysed using a repeated measures ANOVA. Results: In Study 1 there was no effect of treatment for LPO, GSH-T, GPx, TOC or BC. Retinol was higher for both tea (P = 0.0006) and water (P = 0.004) than for orange peel. In Study 2 there was no treatment effect for LPO, GPx, GSH-T, RET, BC or TOC.Conclusions: The results show that a single dose of various nutraceuticals in exercising horses do not produce an effect on either oxidative stress or antioxidant status and further investigation is needed as to whether long-term supplementation would enhance these effects.",
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Oxidative stress and antioxidant status in intensely exercising horses administered nutraceutical extracts. / Smarsh, Danielle; Liburt, N.; Streltsova, J.; McKeever, K.; Williams, C. A.

In: Equine Veterinary Journal, Vol. 42, No. SUPPL. 38, 01.11.2010, p. 317-322.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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