P-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy and near-infrared spectroscopy provide unique quantitative data for evaluation of exercising muscles

Jane H. Park, Daniel Golwyn, Nancy Olsen, John H. Newman, Alvin C. Powers, Beverly C. Davis, Kara Rader, Britton Chance

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

P-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and near-infra spectroscopy (NIRS) have been used to characterize the dynamic aspects of human muscle contraction. P-31 MRS is a non-invasive method for measuring ATP, phosphocreatine (PCr), and pH in exercising muscles and thereby provides information regarding oxidative and glycolytic capacities for generating high energy phosphate compounds. NIRS evaluates kinetic changes in oxygen levels in muscles during exercise and recovery. These two methods provide unique quantitative data for studies of normal muscle contraction and for more complex investigations of muscle diseases. Non-invasive MRS and NIRS examinations are readily repeatable and yield important data for longitudinal patient evaluation and therapeutic management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
EditorsSatish S. Udpa, Hsiu C. Han
PublisherSociety of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers
Pages247-258
Number of pages12
Volume2275
ISBN (Print)0819415995
StatePublished - Dec 1 1994
EventAdvanced Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Detectors - San Diego, CA, USA
Duration: Jul 25 1994Jul 26 1994

Other

OtherAdvanced Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Detectors
CitySan Diego, CA, USA
Period7/25/947/26/94

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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