Pacifier Use and Early Life Weight Outcomes in the Intervention Nurses Start Infants Growing on Healthy Trajectories Study

Emily Hohman, Jennifer Savage Williams, Leann L. Birch, Jessica S. Beiler, Ian Paul

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: Although widely used by infants, little is known about the long-term effects of pacifiers. We investigated relationships between pacifier use in infancy and appetite, temperament, feeding, and weight outcomes through age 2 years using data from the Intervention Nurses Start Infants Growing on Healthy Trajectories study. Methods: Mother-newborn dyads were randomized to a responsive parenting intervention for obesity prevention or a control group. Infants with data on pacifier use (n = 250) were categorized as using a pacifier beyond early infancy (≥4 months of age) or not. Anthropometrics were measured at 6 months, 1, and 2 years with overweight defined as weight-for-length ≥95th percentile at 1 year and BMI ≥85th percentile at 2 years. Mothers completed questionnaires on temperament, appetite, and feeding. Results: Infants who used a pacifier at 4 months or later (68%) had greater conditional weight gain from birth to 6 months (p = 0.01), weight-for-length z-score at 1 year (p < 0.001), and BMI z-score at 2 years (p < 0.001) than infants who did not. Infants using a pacifier at ≥4 months were more likely to be overweight at ages 1 year (11.7% vs. 1.3%, p = 0.03) and 2 years (20.1% vs. 7.9%, p = 0.03). Pacifier use was associated with shorter breastfeeding duration and less responsive parent feeding styles, but these variables did not mediate the relationship between pacifiers and weight. Parent-reported temperament and appetite were unrelated to pacifier use. Conclusions: Pacifier use beyond early infancy is associated with accelerated infant growth and toddler overweight, although the reasons for this relationship are unclear.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)58-66
Number of pages9
JournalChildhood Obesity
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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Pacifiers
Nurses
Weights and Measures
Temperament
Appetite
Mothers
Parenting
Breast Feeding
Weight Gain
Obesity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

@article{7a54c13a58a8475882f2cb859a1349b6,
title = "Pacifier Use and Early Life Weight Outcomes in the Intervention Nurses Start Infants Growing on Healthy Trajectories Study",
abstract = "Background: Although widely used by infants, little is known about the long-term effects of pacifiers. We investigated relationships between pacifier use in infancy and appetite, temperament, feeding, and weight outcomes through age 2 years using data from the Intervention Nurses Start Infants Growing on Healthy Trajectories study. Methods: Mother-newborn dyads were randomized to a responsive parenting intervention for obesity prevention or a control group. Infants with data on pacifier use (n = 250) were categorized as using a pacifier beyond early infancy (≥4 months of age) or not. Anthropometrics were measured at 6 months, 1, and 2 years with overweight defined as weight-for-length ≥95th percentile at 1 year and BMI ≥85th percentile at 2 years. Mothers completed questionnaires on temperament, appetite, and feeding. Results: Infants who used a pacifier at 4 months or later (68{\%}) had greater conditional weight gain from birth to 6 months (p = 0.01), weight-for-length z-score at 1 year (p < 0.001), and BMI z-score at 2 years (p < 0.001) than infants who did not. Infants using a pacifier at ≥4 months were more likely to be overweight at ages 1 year (11.7{\%} vs. 1.3{\%}, p = 0.03) and 2 years (20.1{\%} vs. 7.9{\%}, p = 0.03). Pacifier use was associated with shorter breastfeeding duration and less responsive parent feeding styles, but these variables did not mediate the relationship between pacifiers and weight. Parent-reported temperament and appetite were unrelated to pacifier use. Conclusions: Pacifier use beyond early infancy is associated with accelerated infant growth and toddler overweight, although the reasons for this relationship are unclear.",
author = "Emily Hohman and Williams, {Jennifer Savage} and Birch, {Leann L.} and Beiler, {Jessica S.} and Ian Paul",
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Pacifier Use and Early Life Weight Outcomes in the Intervention Nurses Start Infants Growing on Healthy Trajectories Study. / Hohman, Emily; Williams, Jennifer Savage; Birch, Leann L.; Beiler, Jessica S.; Paul, Ian.

In: Childhood Obesity, Vol. 14, No. 1, 01.01.2018, p. 58-66.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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