Painless compressive cervical myelopathy with false localizing sensory findings

Zachary Simmons, José Biller Md, David W. Beck Md, William Keyes Md

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Five patients who presented with clearly defined thoracic sensory levels were found by myelography and follow-up computed tomography (CT) to have cervical spinal cord compression. None of these patients had pain or an imme-diate preceding history of trauma. There is currently no satisfactory explanation for the large discrepancy between the sensory level and the level of cord compression in such patients. It is crucial that the clinician recognize the possibility of a cervical cord lesion in patients with such a presentation so that appropriate radiographic studies can be performed. Failure to appreciate this syndrome could result in failure to diagnose a treatable lesion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)869-872
Number of pages4
JournalSpine
Volume11
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1986

Fingerprint

Spinal Cord Compression
Myelography
Thorax
Tomography
Pain
Wounds and Injuries
Cervical Cord

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Simmons, Zachary ; Biller Md, José ; Beck Md, David W. ; Keyes Md, William. / Painless compressive cervical myelopathy with false localizing sensory findings. In: Spine. 1986 ; Vol. 11, No. 9. pp. 869-872.
@article{cf1a03279b3f4e6b89e9f32fa1b0550a,
title = "Painless compressive cervical myelopathy with false localizing sensory findings",
abstract = "Five patients who presented with clearly defined thoracic sensory levels were found by myelography and follow-up computed tomography (CT) to have cervical spinal cord compression. None of these patients had pain or an imme-diate preceding history of trauma. There is currently no satisfactory explanation for the large discrepancy between the sensory level and the level of cord compression in such patients. It is crucial that the clinician recognize the possibility of a cervical cord lesion in patients with such a presentation so that appropriate radiographic studies can be performed. Failure to appreciate this syndrome could result in failure to diagnose a treatable lesion.",
author = "Zachary Simmons and {Biller Md}, Jos{\'e} and {Beck Md}, {David W.} and {Keyes Md}, William",
year = "1986",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/00007632-198611000-00004",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "11",
pages = "869--872",
journal = "Spine",
issn = "0362-2436",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "9",

}

Painless compressive cervical myelopathy with false localizing sensory findings. / Simmons, Zachary; Biller Md, José; Beck Md, David W.; Keyes Md, William.

In: Spine, Vol. 11, No. 9, 01.01.1986, p. 869-872.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Painless compressive cervical myelopathy with false localizing sensory findings

AU - Simmons, Zachary

AU - Biller Md, José

AU - Beck Md, David W.

AU - Keyes Md, William

PY - 1986/1/1

Y1 - 1986/1/1

N2 - Five patients who presented with clearly defined thoracic sensory levels were found by myelography and follow-up computed tomography (CT) to have cervical spinal cord compression. None of these patients had pain or an imme-diate preceding history of trauma. There is currently no satisfactory explanation for the large discrepancy between the sensory level and the level of cord compression in such patients. It is crucial that the clinician recognize the possibility of a cervical cord lesion in patients with such a presentation so that appropriate radiographic studies can be performed. Failure to appreciate this syndrome could result in failure to diagnose a treatable lesion.

AB - Five patients who presented with clearly defined thoracic sensory levels were found by myelography and follow-up computed tomography (CT) to have cervical spinal cord compression. None of these patients had pain or an imme-diate preceding history of trauma. There is currently no satisfactory explanation for the large discrepancy between the sensory level and the level of cord compression in such patients. It is crucial that the clinician recognize the possibility of a cervical cord lesion in patients with such a presentation so that appropriate radiographic studies can be performed. Failure to appreciate this syndrome could result in failure to diagnose a treatable lesion.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0022884781&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0022884781&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/00007632-198611000-00004

DO - 10.1097/00007632-198611000-00004

M3 - Article

C2 - 3824062

AN - SCOPUS:0022884781

VL - 11

SP - 869

EP - 872

JO - Spine

JF - Spine

SN - 0362-2436

IS - 9

ER -