Paradigm for shape-based image analysis

Joseph M. Reinhardt, William E. Higgins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Traditional image segmentation techniques typically divide an image into separate regions based on gray-scale characteristics. Most real-world image-segmentation problems, however, require some subsequent shape-based processing to yield acceptable results. Unfortunately, choosing an appropriate sequence of image-processing operators (a process) for this purpose can be a time-consuming, tedious procedure that requires considerable image-processing expertise. We describe a semiautomatic paradigm for selecting shape-based operations for an image-analysis process. Desired shape information for image regions is provided by the user in the form of easily specified cues. The cues are then automatically interpreted to select suitable image-processing operators and operator parameters; the operators can be morphological, topological, and image-manipulation functions. The paradigm, hence, enables easy prototyping of image-analysis processes for different problems. The user is not required to be an image-processing expert to apply this strategy - he or she need only be able to specify the desired shape properties of the regions in the image. We demonstrate our approach for both 2-D and 3-D image analysis problems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)570-581
Number of pages12
JournalOptical Engineering
Volume37
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 1 1998

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image analysis
Image analysis
Image processing
image processing
Image segmentation
operators
cues
gray scale
manipulators
Processing

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Reinhardt, Joseph M. ; Higgins, William E. / Paradigm for shape-based image analysis. In: Optical Engineering. 1998 ; Vol. 37, No. 2. pp. 570-581.
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Reinhardt, JM & Higgins, WE 1998, 'Paradigm for shape-based image analysis', Optical Engineering, vol. 37, no. 2, pp. 570-581.

Paradigm for shape-based image analysis. / Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Higgins, William E.

In: Optical Engineering, Vol. 37, No. 2, 01.02.1998, p. 570-581.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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