Paradoxical vocal cord motion-haloperidol usage in acute attack treatment

Emin Karaman, Cihan Duman, Yalcin Alimoglu, Hüseyin Isildak, Ferhan Oz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Paradoxical vocal cord motion (PVCM) is an uncommon disease characterized by vocal cord adduction during inspiration and/or expiration. It can create shortness of breath, wheezing, respiratory stridor, or breathy dysphonia. Possible etiological factors include asthma, underlying psychologic condition, gastroesophageal acid reflux disease, respiratory irritants exposure, central neurologic diseases, viral upper airway infections, and postsurgical procedures. Many treatment modalities were performed for acute attack of PVCM, including reassurance and onsite maneuvers, benzodiazepines, heliox, and so forth. We report a patient with PVCM who had stridor and dyspnea for 10 days and responded to intravenous haloperidol treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1602-1604
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Craniofacial Surgery
Volume20
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2009

Fingerprint

Vocal Cords
Haloperidol
Respiratory Sounds
Dyspnea
Dysphonia
Irritants
Central Nervous System Diseases
Therapeutics
Gastroesophageal Reflux
Benzodiazepines
Asthma
Acids
Infection

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Karaman, Emin ; Duman, Cihan ; Alimoglu, Yalcin ; Isildak, Hüseyin ; Oz, Ferhan. / Paradoxical vocal cord motion-haloperidol usage in acute attack treatment. In: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery. 2009 ; Vol. 20, No. 5. pp. 1602-1604.
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Paradoxical vocal cord motion-haloperidol usage in acute attack treatment. / Karaman, Emin; Duman, Cihan; Alimoglu, Yalcin; Isildak, Hüseyin; Oz, Ferhan.

In: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery, Vol. 20, No. 5, 01.09.2009, p. 1602-1604.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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