Parametric studies on modified configurations of ball-type passive balancers for improved transient and steadystate responses

Ahmad M. Haidar, Jose Palacios

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

A passive balancing device is a bearing with a set of masses that are free to move about a shaft axis of rotation. Beyond the first critical speed of the shaft, the masses assume positions that reduce vibrations due to imbalance. The conventional design of passive balancers is a dual-ball bearing. This type of balancer only performs its function at supercritical speeds and when the ball/track contact is nearly frictionless. In this work, additional experimental verification of a previously formulated mathematical model is conducted using published experimental data. The model was then used to investigate passive balancing performance numerically. Conventional and non-conventional bearing configurations were tested with consideration of rolling resistance and ball collisions. Results suggest that when rolling resistance is considered, a 1-track bearing configuration with any number of balls yields better performance than multi-track bearings. The 1-track configuration improved performance by 57% when compared to a 3-track configuration at supercritical steadystate. It is also shown that a multi-partition balancer improves performance significantly during shaft speed up – 69% improvement compared to a balancer without partitions. With configuration adjustments, the bearing remains entirely passive while vibration suppression performance is improved.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)633-652
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Sound and Vibration
Volume432
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 13 2018

Fingerprint

Bearings (structural)
transient response
balls
Rolling resistance
configurations
partitions
ball bearings
vibration
axes of rotation
Ball bearings
critical velocity
mathematical models
adjusting
retarding
Mathematical models
collisions

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

@article{650d5c0507354a668a059173651ed2b2,
title = "Parametric studies on modified configurations of ball-type passive balancers for improved transient and steadystate responses",
abstract = "A passive balancing device is a bearing with a set of masses that are free to move about a shaft axis of rotation. Beyond the first critical speed of the shaft, the masses assume positions that reduce vibrations due to imbalance. The conventional design of passive balancers is a dual-ball bearing. This type of balancer only performs its function at supercritical speeds and when the ball/track contact is nearly frictionless. In this work, additional experimental verification of a previously formulated mathematical model is conducted using published experimental data. The model was then used to investigate passive balancing performance numerically. Conventional and non-conventional bearing configurations were tested with consideration of rolling resistance and ball collisions. Results suggest that when rolling resistance is considered, a 1-track bearing configuration with any number of balls yields better performance than multi-track bearings. The 1-track configuration improved performance by 57{\%} when compared to a 3-track configuration at supercritical steadystate. It is also shown that a multi-partition balancer improves performance significantly during shaft speed up – 69{\%} improvement compared to a balancer without partitions. With configuration adjustments, the bearing remains entirely passive while vibration suppression performance is improved.",
author = "Haidar, {Ahmad M.} and Jose Palacios",
year = "2018",
month = "10",
day = "13",
doi = "10.1016/j.jsv.2018.06.057",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "432",
pages = "633--652",
journal = "Journal of Sound and Vibration",
issn = "0022-460X",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Parametric studies on modified configurations of ball-type passive balancers for improved transient and steadystate responses

AU - Haidar, Ahmad M.

AU - Palacios, Jose

PY - 2018/10/13

Y1 - 2018/10/13

N2 - A passive balancing device is a bearing with a set of masses that are free to move about a shaft axis of rotation. Beyond the first critical speed of the shaft, the masses assume positions that reduce vibrations due to imbalance. The conventional design of passive balancers is a dual-ball bearing. This type of balancer only performs its function at supercritical speeds and when the ball/track contact is nearly frictionless. In this work, additional experimental verification of a previously formulated mathematical model is conducted using published experimental data. The model was then used to investigate passive balancing performance numerically. Conventional and non-conventional bearing configurations were tested with consideration of rolling resistance and ball collisions. Results suggest that when rolling resistance is considered, a 1-track bearing configuration with any number of balls yields better performance than multi-track bearings. The 1-track configuration improved performance by 57% when compared to a 3-track configuration at supercritical steadystate. It is also shown that a multi-partition balancer improves performance significantly during shaft speed up – 69% improvement compared to a balancer without partitions. With configuration adjustments, the bearing remains entirely passive while vibration suppression performance is improved.

AB - A passive balancing device is a bearing with a set of masses that are free to move about a shaft axis of rotation. Beyond the first critical speed of the shaft, the masses assume positions that reduce vibrations due to imbalance. The conventional design of passive balancers is a dual-ball bearing. This type of balancer only performs its function at supercritical speeds and when the ball/track contact is nearly frictionless. In this work, additional experimental verification of a previously formulated mathematical model is conducted using published experimental data. The model was then used to investigate passive balancing performance numerically. Conventional and non-conventional bearing configurations were tested with consideration of rolling resistance and ball collisions. Results suggest that when rolling resistance is considered, a 1-track bearing configuration with any number of balls yields better performance than multi-track bearings. The 1-track configuration improved performance by 57% when compared to a 3-track configuration at supercritical steadystate. It is also shown that a multi-partition balancer improves performance significantly during shaft speed up – 69% improvement compared to a balancer without partitions. With configuration adjustments, the bearing remains entirely passive while vibration suppression performance is improved.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85049442493&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85049442493&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jsv.2018.06.057

DO - 10.1016/j.jsv.2018.06.057

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85049442493

VL - 432

SP - 633

EP - 652

JO - Journal of Sound and Vibration

JF - Journal of Sound and Vibration

SN - 0022-460X

ER -