Parasitism of the invasive brown marmorated stink bug, halyomorpha halys (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae), by the native parasitoid, trichopoda pennipes (diptera: Tachinidae)

Neelendra K. Joshi, Timothy W. Leslie, David J. Biddinger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

The invasive brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae), has been an important agricultural pest in the Mid-Atlantic United States since its introduction in 1996. Biological control by native species may play an important role in suppressing H. halys populations and reduce reliance on chemical control. We collected H. halys adults in agricultural areas of five Pennsylvania counties over two years to examine the extent and characteristics of adult stink bug parasitism by Trichopoda pennipes (Diptera: Tachinidae), a native parasitoid of hemipterans. The overall parasitism rate (in terms of T. pennipes egg deposition) was 2.38 percent. Rates differed among counties and seasons, but not between years. Instances of supernumerary oviposition were evident, and eggs were more commonly found on the ventral side of the thorax, although no differences in egg deposition were found between males and female hosts. T. pennipes has begun to target H. halys adults in Pennsylvania and has the potential to play a role in regulating this pest. Adult parasitism of H. halys by T. pennipes should continue to be monitored, and landscape management and ecological pest management practices that conserve T. pennipes populations should be supported in agricultural areas where H. halys is found.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number66
JournalBiology
Volume8
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2019

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Parasitism of the invasive brown marmorated stink bug, halyomorpha halys (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae), by the native parasitoid, trichopoda pennipes (diptera: Tachinidae)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this