Parental deployment and distress, and adolescent disordered eating in prevention-seeking military dependents

M. K. Higgins Neyland, Lisa M. Shank, Natasha L. Burke, Natasha A. Schvey, Abigail Pine, Mary Quattlebaum, William Leu, Dakota Gillmore, Alexandria Morettini, Denise E. Wilfley, Mark Stephens, Tracy Sbrocco, Jack A. Yanovski, Sarah Jorgensen, David A. Klein, Cara H. Olsen, Jeffrey Quinlan, Marian Tanofsky-Kraff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Parental military deployment can lead to stress in the family system due to concerns about the deployed service-member's safety and increased responsibilities for those not deployed. Parent-related stress can impact adolescent disordered eating. Given the important role that stress plays in disordered eating and obesity, it is crucial to understand the impacts of unique stressors to which vulnerable populations are exposed. Method: We studied 126 adolescent (14.3 ± 1.6 years; 59.5% girls; 44.4% non-Hispanic White; BMI-z, 1.91 ±.39) military dependents prior to entering an obesity and binge-eating disorder prevention trial. The Eating Disorder Examination was used to assess adolescent disordered eating. Parents self-reported their own distress and family deployment history that occurred during the adolescent's lifetime. Results: Parental distress interacted with frequency of parental deployments such that for those with high parental distress, more frequent deployment was associated with greater adolescent shape and weight concerns (β =.21, p =.012) and global eating pathology (β =.18, p =.024). Discussion: In this hypothesis-generating study, the combination of number of deployments and parental distress may be associated with disordered eating among adolescent military dependents seeking prevention of binge-eating disorder and adult obesity. If these preliminary findings are supported longitudinally, interventions to reduce parental stress related to deployment may be warranted to reduce disordered eating in adolescent dependents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalInternational Journal of Eating Disorders
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

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Eating
Binge-Eating Disorder
Obesity
Vulnerable Populations
Parents
History
Pathology
Safety
Weights and Measures

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Higgins Neyland, M. K., Shank, L. M., Burke, N. L., Schvey, N. A., Pine, A., Quattlebaum, M., ... Tanofsky-Kraff, M. (Accepted/In press). Parental deployment and distress, and adolescent disordered eating in prevention-seeking military dependents. International Journal of Eating Disorders. https://doi.org/10.1002/eat.23180
Higgins Neyland, M. K. ; Shank, Lisa M. ; Burke, Natasha L. ; Schvey, Natasha A. ; Pine, Abigail ; Quattlebaum, Mary ; Leu, William ; Gillmore, Dakota ; Morettini, Alexandria ; Wilfley, Denise E. ; Stephens, Mark ; Sbrocco, Tracy ; Yanovski, Jack A. ; Jorgensen, Sarah ; Klein, David A. ; Olsen, Cara H. ; Quinlan, Jeffrey ; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian. / Parental deployment and distress, and adolescent disordered eating in prevention-seeking military dependents. In: International Journal of Eating Disorders. 2019.
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abstract = "Objective: Parental military deployment can lead to stress in the family system due to concerns about the deployed service-member's safety and increased responsibilities for those not deployed. Parent-related stress can impact adolescent disordered eating. Given the important role that stress plays in disordered eating and obesity, it is crucial to understand the impacts of unique stressors to which vulnerable populations are exposed. Method: We studied 126 adolescent (14.3 ± 1.6 years; 59.5{\%} girls; 44.4{\%} non-Hispanic White; BMI-z, 1.91 ±.39) military dependents prior to entering an obesity and binge-eating disorder prevention trial. The Eating Disorder Examination was used to assess adolescent disordered eating. Parents self-reported their own distress and family deployment history that occurred during the adolescent's lifetime. Results: Parental distress interacted with frequency of parental deployments such that for those with high parental distress, more frequent deployment was associated with greater adolescent shape and weight concerns (β =.21, p =.012) and global eating pathology (β =.18, p =.024). Discussion: In this hypothesis-generating study, the combination of number of deployments and parental distress may be associated with disordered eating among adolescent military dependents seeking prevention of binge-eating disorder and adult obesity. If these preliminary findings are supported longitudinally, interventions to reduce parental stress related to deployment may be warranted to reduce disordered eating in adolescent dependents.",
author = "{Higgins Neyland}, {M. K.} and Shank, {Lisa M.} and Burke, {Natasha L.} and Schvey, {Natasha A.} and Abigail Pine and Mary Quattlebaum and William Leu and Dakota Gillmore and Alexandria Morettini and Wilfley, {Denise E.} and Mark Stephens and Tracy Sbrocco and Yanovski, {Jack A.} and Sarah Jorgensen and Klein, {David A.} and Olsen, {Cara H.} and Jeffrey Quinlan and Marian Tanofsky-Kraff",
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Higgins Neyland, MK, Shank, LM, Burke, NL, Schvey, NA, Pine, A, Quattlebaum, M, Leu, W, Gillmore, D, Morettini, A, Wilfley, DE, Stephens, M, Sbrocco, T, Yanovski, JA, Jorgensen, S, Klein, DA, Olsen, CH, Quinlan, J & Tanofsky-Kraff, M 2019, 'Parental deployment and distress, and adolescent disordered eating in prevention-seeking military dependents', International Journal of Eating Disorders. https://doi.org/10.1002/eat.23180

Parental deployment and distress, and adolescent disordered eating in prevention-seeking military dependents. / Higgins Neyland, M. K.; Shank, Lisa M.; Burke, Natasha L.; Schvey, Natasha A.; Pine, Abigail; Quattlebaum, Mary; Leu, William; Gillmore, Dakota; Morettini, Alexandria; Wilfley, Denise E.; Stephens, Mark; Sbrocco, Tracy; Yanovski, Jack A.; Jorgensen, Sarah; Klein, David A.; Olsen, Cara H.; Quinlan, Jeffrey; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian.

In: International Journal of Eating Disorders, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Parental deployment and distress, and adolescent disordered eating in prevention-seeking military dependents

AU - Higgins Neyland, M. K.

AU - Shank, Lisa M.

AU - Burke, Natasha L.

AU - Schvey, Natasha A.

AU - Pine, Abigail

AU - Quattlebaum, Mary

AU - Leu, William

AU - Gillmore, Dakota

AU - Morettini, Alexandria

AU - Wilfley, Denise E.

AU - Stephens, Mark

AU - Sbrocco, Tracy

AU - Yanovski, Jack A.

AU - Jorgensen, Sarah

AU - Klein, David A.

AU - Olsen, Cara H.

AU - Quinlan, Jeffrey

AU - Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Objective: Parental military deployment can lead to stress in the family system due to concerns about the deployed service-member's safety and increased responsibilities for those not deployed. Parent-related stress can impact adolescent disordered eating. Given the important role that stress plays in disordered eating and obesity, it is crucial to understand the impacts of unique stressors to which vulnerable populations are exposed. Method: We studied 126 adolescent (14.3 ± 1.6 years; 59.5% girls; 44.4% non-Hispanic White; BMI-z, 1.91 ±.39) military dependents prior to entering an obesity and binge-eating disorder prevention trial. The Eating Disorder Examination was used to assess adolescent disordered eating. Parents self-reported their own distress and family deployment history that occurred during the adolescent's lifetime. Results: Parental distress interacted with frequency of parental deployments such that for those with high parental distress, more frequent deployment was associated with greater adolescent shape and weight concerns (β =.21, p =.012) and global eating pathology (β =.18, p =.024). Discussion: In this hypothesis-generating study, the combination of number of deployments and parental distress may be associated with disordered eating among adolescent military dependents seeking prevention of binge-eating disorder and adult obesity. If these preliminary findings are supported longitudinally, interventions to reduce parental stress related to deployment may be warranted to reduce disordered eating in adolescent dependents.

AB - Objective: Parental military deployment can lead to stress in the family system due to concerns about the deployed service-member's safety and increased responsibilities for those not deployed. Parent-related stress can impact adolescent disordered eating. Given the important role that stress plays in disordered eating and obesity, it is crucial to understand the impacts of unique stressors to which vulnerable populations are exposed. Method: We studied 126 adolescent (14.3 ± 1.6 years; 59.5% girls; 44.4% non-Hispanic White; BMI-z, 1.91 ±.39) military dependents prior to entering an obesity and binge-eating disorder prevention trial. The Eating Disorder Examination was used to assess adolescent disordered eating. Parents self-reported their own distress and family deployment history that occurred during the adolescent's lifetime. Results: Parental distress interacted with frequency of parental deployments such that for those with high parental distress, more frequent deployment was associated with greater adolescent shape and weight concerns (β =.21, p =.012) and global eating pathology (β =.18, p =.024). Discussion: In this hypothesis-generating study, the combination of number of deployments and parental distress may be associated with disordered eating among adolescent military dependents seeking prevention of binge-eating disorder and adult obesity. If these preliminary findings are supported longitudinally, interventions to reduce parental stress related to deployment may be warranted to reduce disordered eating in adolescent dependents.

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