Parental information seeking following a positive newborn screening for cystic fibrosis

James Price Dillard, Lijiang Shen, Jeffrey D. Robinson, Phillip M. Farrell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This investigation focused on the information-seeking behaviors of parents (N=38) whose newborn had received a positive screening result for cystic fibrosis. Roughly half of the participants actively sought information about their child's potential disease prior to the clinic visit. The most common sources of information were the Internet, pediatricians, and family physicians. Analysis of behavior during the clinic visit showed rates of question asking that were judged as low, but they were comparable to the results of other studies. It was observed that parents occasionally would collaborate in the production of a single question. More educated parents tended to produce such questions more frequently. Importantly, frequency of collaborative questions was positively correlated with enhanced knowledge of cystic fibrosis six weeks after the clinic visit and with apparent dissatisfaction with the counseling interaction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)880-894
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Health Communication
Volume15
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010

Fingerprint

Ambulatory Care
Cystic Fibrosis
Screening
parents
Parents
Newborn Infant
Internet
Information Seeking Behavior
family physician
information-seeking behavior
Family Physicians
source of information
Counseling
counseling
Disease
interaction

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Communication
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Library and Information Sciences

Cite this

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Parental information seeking following a positive newborn screening for cystic fibrosis. / Dillard, James Price; Shen, Lijiang; Robinson, Jeffrey D.; Farrell, Phillip M.

In: Journal of Health Communication, Vol. 15, No. 8, 01.12.2010, p. 880-894.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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