Parental mediation, cyber victimization, adjustment difficulties, and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Parental mediation of technology use is proposed to protect against the risk of cyber victimization and the associated negative consequences. Although the buffering effects of parental mediation of technology use are currently being investigated, little attention has focused on whether parental mediation protects against the depression, anxiety, and loneliness associated with cyber victimization among adolescents with autism spectrum disorders. The present study focused on this gap in the literature by investigating the buffering effect of parental mediation on the associations between cyber victimization and depression, anxiety, and loneliness. Participants were 128 6th through 8th graders from the Midwestern United States (ages range from 11-16 years old; 89% male), and they completed questionnaires on their perceptions of parental mediation of technology use, cyber victimization, face-to-face victimization, depression, loneliness, and anxiety. After controlling for face-to-face victimization, the findings revealed that high levels of perceived parental technology mediation made the relationship between cyber victimization and depression more negative, while lower levels of perceived parental technology mediation made the association more positive. These patterns were not found for anxiety or loneliness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCyberpsychology
Volume11
Issue number1Special Issue
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

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Social Adjustment
Crime Victims
autism
victimization
mediation
Loneliness
adolescent
Technology
Anxiety
Depression
anxiety
Midwestern United States
Autism Spectrum Disorder
questionnaire

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Communication
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "Parental mediation of technology use is proposed to protect against the risk of cyber victimization and the associated negative consequences. Although the buffering effects of parental mediation of technology use are currently being investigated, little attention has focused on whether parental mediation protects against the depression, anxiety, and loneliness associated with cyber victimization among adolescents with autism spectrum disorders. The present study focused on this gap in the literature by investigating the buffering effect of parental mediation on the associations between cyber victimization and depression, anxiety, and loneliness. Participants were 128 6th through 8th graders from the Midwestern United States (ages range from 11-16 years old; 89{\%} male), and they completed questionnaires on their perceptions of parental mediation of technology use, cyber victimization, face-to-face victimization, depression, loneliness, and anxiety. After controlling for face-to-face victimization, the findings revealed that high levels of perceived parental technology mediation made the relationship between cyber victimization and depression more negative, while lower levels of perceived parental technology mediation made the association more positive. These patterns were not found for anxiety or loneliness.",
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Parental mediation, cyber victimization, adjustment difficulties, and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder. / Wright, Michelle F.

In: Cyberpsychology, Vol. 11, No. 1Special Issue, 01.01.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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